Mission the idea that the us has a god given purpose

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mission : : The idea that the US has a God-given purpose to establish and spread the free society. Often identified as one of three traditional beliefs underlying US foreign policy (along with isolationism and the Monroe Doctrine), mission has had two main interpretations. One could be called
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Passive Mission. This form of mission dominated people's thinking from the early settlements (certainly the Puritans) to ca. 1840. It argues that the US has a duty to act as an example for the world. The second interpretation of mission could be called Active Mission. It emerged ca. 1840 along with Manifest Destiny and argued that being an example was not enough and that the US needed to take action to spread the free society. One way to do that was to expand the borders of the US and thereby extend the blessings of the American way of life and its superior government, economy, religion, etc. to other people and lands. In the 1840s this aggressive, self-righteous attitude promoted the coming of the Mexican War and the acquisition of Texas (1845) and the Mexican Cession (1848). missionary diplomacy : Wilson's foreign policy which intended to promote liberal and humanitarian ends and which was based on the idea that the US has a mission to promote morality, democracy, and idealism around the world. This policy in action, however, led to US intervention in other countries (Latin America) which often considered such action by the US to be immoral, anti- democratic, and in the US's self-interest. Mississippi Plan : The plan for circumventing the 15th Amendment and disfranchising blacks in the South. Initially, ca. 1875, the plan was associated with the Redeemers and the harassment of blacks and other Republicans to keep them from voting and thereby return the South to the control of native white Southerners. Beginning in 1890, the Mississippi Plan referred to four requirements for voting—first in Mississippi and then across the South. These requirements were: 1) residence in the state for usually two years, 2) no criminal record, 3) payment of the poll tax, with proof, and 4) satisfactory performance on a literacy test. A grandfather clause was added which allowed whites to vote because their grandfathers had voted, even if they could not pass the literacy test. Most grandfathers of blacks were slaves and had not voted. This plan spread across the South, and by 1900 blacks had largely lost the right to vote in the South. This is representative of the degradation of blacks in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Monroe Doctrine : A U.S. policy statement issued by President Monroe in 1823 which declared that Latin America was no longer open to European colonization. This doctrine was used by the U.S. at different times to support both policies of isolationism and policies of active mission. In 1823, the doctrine was primarily isolationist in tone and effect; in the 1840s and in the 1890s and early 1900s, it became a justification for aggressive, interventionist policies by the U.S. as in the Mexican War of the 1840s and the Spanish-American War of 1898 and the
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Roosevelt Corollary of 1904. The U.S. also came to insist that the doctrine was
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