Cultural differences may include interpersonal

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Cultural differences may include: Interpersonal approach Thinking/learning styles Expectations Responsibilities Priority setting Experience and working styles Gender and kinship differences. You must identify and accept the cultural realities of the people you are working with – identify the changes that you may need to make in your behaviour to accommodate them. This will ensure that you gain their full participation in service delivery, as they cannot reasonably exclude themselves if you have made steps to meet their cultural reality.
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P a g e | 33 Activity 1B
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P a g e | 34 1.3 – Establish key aspects of cultural safety in consultation with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people By the end of this chapter the learner should: Identify how to demonstrate the following in the workplace: o mutual respect o tolerance of diversity o shared understanding of cultural safety. Workplace relationships should be based on three things: Mutual respect Tolerance of diversity Shared understanding of cultural safety. Mutual respect You must respect the rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to retain their cultural heritage and interests, just as they must respect yours. You will need to consider the following: How people wish to be portrayed (in media formats) How people wish to be addressed People's attitudes to touch People's attitudes to swearing People's style of appearance How people wish to be greeted. Tolerance of diversity Everyone is different and someone being from another culture, which has beliefs that are foreign to you, does not mean they should be shunned or ridiculed. You must learn to accept the diversity of your work community and not discriminate against others or look at them unfavourably. There should be no resentment to people from other cultures, races etc. Based on these factors – of course, there will be workplace disputes but they should not be on the basis of cultural resentment. You should view differences and diversity as a strength, rather than a weakness. This allows you as a group to have a wider perspective of the world and to be able to empathise with more people. On a
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P a g e | 35 personal level, you can focus on common ground, rather than highlighting the differences between individuals. Shared understanding of cultural safety "Cultural safety" is a term developed in the 1980s in New Zealand – it moves beyond cultural sensitivity to analyse power imbalances, institutional discrimination, colonisation and relationships with colonisers. Culturally unsafe practices are those which diminish, demean or disempower the cultural identity and wellbeing of an individual. A definitive definition of cultural safety does not exist – there is debate on how it differs from cultural awareness, cultural sensitivity, cultural appropriateness and cultural competency.
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