System archaeology system archaeology is a technique

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and new requirements for the new system can be identified. System archaeology System archaeology is a technique that extracts information required to build a new system from the documentation or implementation (code) of a legacy system or a competitor’s system. The technique is often applied when explicit knowledge about the system logic has been lost partially or entirely. By analyzing existing code, the requirements engi- neer ensures that none of the functionalities of the legacy system will be overlooked and the system logic of the legacy system is elicited anew. This method leads to a large amount of very detailed require- ments and is very laborious. However, system archaeology is the only technique that can ensure that all functionalities of the legacy system will be implemented in the new system. When it becomes obviously apparent that the legacy system and the new system differ in function- ality, additional elicitation techniques, e.g., creativity techniques, must be applied early on. Perspective-based reading Perspective-based reading (see section 7.5.4 ) is applied when docu- ments need to be read with a particular perspective in mind, e.g., the perspective of the implementer or the tester. Aspects that are contained in the document but do not pertain to the current perspective are ignored. This allows for an analysis that is strictly focused on particular parts of the existing documentation. This way, detailed, technology- related or implementation-related aspects can be separated from essen- tial operational aspects that are relevant for the successor system. Reuse Reuse: Requirements that have been previously compiled and brought up to a certain quality standard can be reused. In order to do that, the requirements are stored in a database, for instance, and kept available at the required level of detail for reuse. Through reuse, the costs involved with the elicitation procedures can be significantly reduced.
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3.3 Elicitation Techniques 29 3.3.5 Observation Techniques Question observations and optimize processes. When domain specialists are unable to spend the time needed to share their expertise with the requirements engineer, or are unable to express and denote their knowledge, observation techniques are helpful. During observation, the requirements engineer observes the stakeholders while they go about their work. The requirements engineer documents all steps and thus elicits the processes the system must support as well as potential mistakes, risks, and open questions. All those are potential requirements that need to be formulated. The stakeholders can actively demonstrate their knowledge in using the application or can remain passive, with the requirements engineer merely observing. The requirements engineer ought to question the observed processes so that the situation as it should be can be established. Otherwise, she is at risk of documenting outdated technological decisions and suboptimal processes (i.e., the situation as is and not as it should be). As the requirements engineer is an external
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