Brown dwarf An object too small to be an ordinary star because it cannot

Brown dwarf an object too small to be an ordinary

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Brown dwarf An object too small to be an ordinary star because it cannot produce enough energy by fusion in its core to compensate for the radiative energy it loses from its surface. A brown dwarf has a mass less than 0.08 times that of the Sun. Bulge The spherical structure at the center of a spiral galaxy that is made up primarily of old stars, gas, and dust. The Milky Way’s bulge is roughly 15,000 light-years across. Carbonaceous chondrite A meteorite with embedded pebble-sized granules that contain significant quantities of organic (complex carbon-rich) matter. Cassegrain telescope A type of reflecting telescope whose eyepiece is located behind the primary mirror. The primary mirror is cast with a hole in the center. When light enters the telescope, it reflects from the primary mirror to the secondary mirror. The secondary mirror reflects the light back through the hole in the primary mirror to the eyepiece. Celestial Of or relating to the sky or visible objects in the sky, like the Moon, Sun, planets, comets, asteroids, stars, and galaxies. Celestial object An object in the sky – examples include the Moon, the Sun, planets, comets, asteroids, stars, and galaxies. Celestial sphere An imaginary sphere encompassing the Earth that represents the sky. Astronomers chart the sky using the celestial coordinates of the sphere to locate objects in the cosmos. This sphere is divided into 88 sections called constellations. Objects are sometimes named for the major constellation in which they appear. Celsius (Centigrade) temperature scale A temperature scale on which the freezing point of water is 0°C and the boiling point is 100°C. Cepheid variable A type of pulsating star whose light and energy output vary noticeably over a set period of time. The time period over which the star varies is directly related to its light output or luminosity, making these stars useful standard candles for measuring intergalactic distances. Chandra X-Ray Observatory A space-based X-ray observatory; also known as the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). Chandra is designed to observe X-rays from high-energy regions of the universe, such as hot gas in the remnants of exploded stars. The satellite was launched and deployed in July 1999. Charge-coupled device (CCD) An electronic detector that records visible light from stars and galaxies to make photographs. These detectors are very sensitive to the extremely faint light of distant galaxies. They can see objects that are 1,000 million times fainter than the eye can see. CCDs are electronic circuits composed of light-sensitive picture elements (pixels), tiny cells that, placed together, resemble mesh on a screen door. The same CCD technology is used in digital cameras. Chemical compound A pure substance consisting of atoms or ions of two or more different elements. The elements are in definite proportions. A chemical compound usually possesses properties unlike those of its constituent elements. For example,
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