Tobacco cessation fall 2011 Instructor (1)_ For use in lecture (3)

Osteoporosis periodontitis poor surgical outcomes us

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osteoporosis, periodontitis, poor  surgical outcomes U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2004). The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General .
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USDHHS. (2006). The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: Report of the Surgeon General. There is no  safe level of  second-hand  smoke. Second-hand smoke causes premature death and  disease in nonsmokers (children and adults) Children:  Increased risk for sudden infant death syndrome  (SIDS), acute respiratory infections, ear problems, and  more severe asthma 2006 REPORT of the  SURGEON GENERAL:  INVOLUNTARY EXPOSURE to TOBACCO  SMOKE Respiratory symptoms and slowed lung growth if parents smoke Adults: Immediate adverse effects on cardiovascular system Increased risk for coronary heart disease and lung cancer Millions of Americans are exposed to smoke in their homes/workplaces Indoor spaces: eliminating smoking fully protects nonsmokers Separating smoking areas, cleaning the air, and ventilation are ineffective
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QUITTING: HEALTH  BENEFITS Lung cilia regain normal function Ability to clear lungs of mucus increases Coughing, fatigue, shortness of breath decrease Excess risk of CHD decreases to half that of a continuing smoker Risk of stroke is reduced to that of people who have never smoked Lung cancer death rate drops to half that of a continuing smoker Risk of cancer of mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney, pancreas decrease Risk of CHD is similar to that of people who have never smoked 2 weeks to 3 months 1 to 9 months 1 year 5 years 10 years after 15 years Time Since Quit Date Circulation improves, walking becomes easier Lung function increases up to 30%
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BENEFICIAL EFFECTS of  QUITTING: PULMONARY EFFECTS Reprinted with permission. Fletcher & Peto. (1977). BMJ 1(6077):1645–1648. Disabilit y Death Smoked regularly and susceptible to effects of smoke Never smoked or not susceptible to smoke Stopped smoking at 45 (mild COPD) Stopped smoking at 65 (severe COPD) 25 FEV 1 (% of value at age 25) 25 50 75 100 0 50 75 Age (years) COPD = chronic obstructive pulmonary disease AT ANY AGE, there are benefits of quitting. AT ANY AGE, there are benefits of quitting.
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0 5 10 15 30 40 50 60 Years of life gained Age at cessation (years) Prospective study of 34,439 male British doctors Mortality was monitored for 50 years (1951–2001) On average, cigarette smokers die approximately 10 years younger than do nonsmokers. Among those who continue smoking, at least half will die due to a tobacco-related disease. SMOKING CESSATION:  REDUCED RISK of DEATH Doll et al. (2004). BMJ 328(7455):1519–1527.
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FINANCIAL IMPACT of SMOKING Packs per  day Buying cigarettes every day for 50 years @ $4.32 per pack Money banked monthly, earning 4% interest Dollars lost, in thousands $755,177 0 200 400 600 800 $251,725 $503,451 $755,177
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  NICOTINE PHARMACOLOGY  and PRINCIPLES of  ADDICTION
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NICOTINE ADDICTION U.S. Surgeon General’s Report  (1988) Cigarettes and other forms of tobacco are  addicting.
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