Just below top managers are middle managers including

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Just below top managers are middle managers, including plant, operations, and division managers, who implement strategies, policies, and decisions made by top managers. Supervisors and office managers are the first-line managers who work with and supervise the employees who report to them. In any large company, most managers work in one of five areas. Human resource managers hire and train employees, assess performance, and fix compensation. Operations managers are responsible for production, inventory, and quality control. Marketing managers are responsible for getting products from producers to consumers. Information managers design and implement systems to gather, organize, and distribute information. Some firms have a top manager called a chief executive officer. Financial managers,
including the chief financial officer, division controllers, and accounting supervisors, oversee accounting functions and financial resources. Diff: 2 Type: ES Page Ref: 127-129 Skill: Comprehension Objective: 6.2 9) List the three basic levels of management and explain how both the power and complexity of their duties increases as we move from the lowest level to the highest level. Answer: Top managers are responsible for a firm’s overall performance and effectiveness. Middle managers implement the strategies and work toward the goals set by top managers. First-line managers supervise the work of operating employees (i.e., individuals who are not managers and have no subordinates). The power of top managers is greater than the power of middle managers, whose power in turn is greater than that of first-line managers. The job complexity of top managers is greater than that of middle managers because top managers must develop the overall strategy for the organization. Likewise, the job complexity of middle managers is greater than that of first- line managers because middle managers must translate top management directives into actions that first-line managers must take. Diff: 2 Type: ES Page Ref: 127-128 Skill: Comprehension Objective: 6.2 10) What is the difference between the “functions of management” and “roles of management”? Answer: The functions of management are planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. These functions give us a good general picture of what managers do, but they may not give a clear idea of the specific activities that managers are involved in. The roles approach does give these specific insights. For example, Mintzberg believes that a manager’s job can be described as 10 specific roles in three general categories. There are three interpersonal roles : (1) figurehead (duties of a ceremonial nature, such as attending a subordinate’s wedding); (2) leader (being responsible for the work of the unit); and (3) liaison (making contact outside the vertical chain of command). There
are also three informational roles : (1) monitor (scanning the environment for relevant information); (2) disseminator (passing information to subordinates); and (3) spokesperson (sending information to people outside the unit). Finally, there are four

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