Emerson romeros film name was tommy albert born in

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Emerson Romero’s film name was Tommy Albert. Born in Cuba, he received his education at the Wright Oral School in New York City. His brother Dorian produced Spanish- captioned silent movies in Cuba for the Pan American Picture Corporation, and Romero starred in several comedies for the company. While there, he came to the attention of American director
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Richard Harlan, who convinced Romero to move to California. In Hollywood for approximately one year, Romero starred in the shore films “Beachnuts,” “The Cat’s Meow,” “Sappy Days,” “Great Guns,” and “Hen-Pecked in Morocco.” Unemployed because of the talkies, Romero returned to New York, where he continued his training and experience. He became very active in efforts to establish a professional deaf repertory company and to produce captions for the now inaccessible talking movies. Another relative, cousin Cesar Romero, became a popular male star. It is ironic that many persons in the deaf community know that Cesar Romero had a deaf relative but did not realize that this deaf relative had also performed in movies. Louis Weinberg also came from New York, where he had attended the Lexington School for the Deaf. Weinberg worked in show business before he acted in the movies. Known as the Russian toe dancer, Weinberg performed on the vaudeville circuit under his stage name, David Marvel. Hollywood tried to build upon the fame of operatic star Geraldine Farrar and produced several movies for her. Weinberg played the role of the Indian prince in one of these films, The Woman God Forgot (1917). Thereafter, Weinberg returned to his dance career in vaudeville. Two other deaf persons performed in silent films. One was a Cuban woman, Carmen de Arcos, who Emerson Romero described as a mute and who worked with him for the Pan American Picture Corporation. Most of the references to her work such as La Chica y El Gato , are through Romero. Little else is known of her career. The other deaf actor was Albert Ballin. Ballin’s acting career primarily consisted of jobs as a movie extra. Attracted to Hollywood in 1924, Ballin sold a movie script, “Sardanapolus,” to the Palmer Photoplay Corporation. Although no one produced his script, Ballin stayed in California and supported himself as an extra and a portrait painter. Continuing his writing, Ballin penned several articles about the movies for deaf community publications and eventually produced a book, The Deaf Mute Howls (1930), which included a section on how the movie industry could benefit from the use of sign language. It is ironic that his most prominent film never was distributed. His Busy Hour , which starred Ballin as a hermit, was the product of the popular notion that deaf people were natural actors because of their skills of expression and mimicry. In 1918 a movie editor for the New York Times , James O. Spearing, brought together a group of deaf actors to make His Busy Hour , which Spearing had written. Although he later worked as a scriptwriter for Paramount Studios on Long Island, New York, Spearing turned to the deaf community for the financial capital to distribute the film. Exhibiting the film to a deaf audience at the Lexington School for the Deaf in 1926, he
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  • Spring '12
  • JanKelley-King
  • The American, Hearing impairment, Silent film, deaf people

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