b Steel which does not contain significant amount of alloying elements other

B steel which does not contain significant amount of

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b. Steel which does not contain significant amount of alloying elements other than carbon. c. Steel whose constituents remain in solution with each other at room temperature, nonmagnetic and corrosion resistant. d. An alloy containing tin, lead or antimony, a matter of 77% cu obtained from the something of sulfide copper ores. 6. Austenitic steel can be defined as: a. Ordinary carbon steel to which has been added elements such as chromium, nickel, etc. b. Steel which does not contain significant amount of alloying elements other than carbon. c. Steel whose constituents remain in solution with each other at room temperature, nonmagnetic and corrosion resistant. d. An alloy containing tin, lead or antimony, a matter of 77% cu obtained from the something of sulfide copper ores. PDF created with pdfFactory Pro trial version
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7. Carbon steel can be defined as: a. Ordinary carbon steel to which has been added elements such as chromium, nickel, etc. b. Steel which does not contain significant amount of alloying elements other than carbon. c. Steel whose constituents remain in solution with each other at room temperature, nonmagnetic and corrosion resistant. d. An alloy containing tin, lead or antimony, a matter of 77% cu obtained from the something of sulfide copper ores. 8. Changes in properties of a metal or alloy that generally occur slowly at room temperatures and more rapidly at elevated temperature is known as: a. Microscopic. b. Alloy. c. Aging. d. anisotropy. e. activation. 9. A substance having metallic properties and being composed of two or more chemical elements of which at least one is an elemental metal is : a. An alloy. b. A chemical. c. A steel d. A composite. e. An element. 10. The term used to denote that a structure is visible at magnification from one to ten diameters is: a. Microscopic. b. Submicroscopic. c. Macroscopic. d. Molecular. e. Seeable. PDF created with pdfFactory Pro trial version
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11. In foundry practice, metal supports for buckling cores in place within sand moulds are known as: a. Closed mould. b. Chills. c. Blind risers. d. Chaplets. 12. Forming or forging dies designed to makes the flow of metal laterally to the cavity within the die set are known as: a. Open dies. b. Chaplets. c. Closed dies. d. Hammer forge. 13. Deviation from the main composition at a particular location in solidified cast metal is referred to as : a. Pipe. b. Inclusion. c. Segregation. d. Hardness. 14. The losses of carbon from the surface of a ferretic alloy as a result of heating in a medium that reacts with the carbon at the surface is: a. Carburizing. b. Decarburizing. c. Burning. d. Deep etching. 15. Conditioning a metallic surface for examination at a magnification of 10 diameters or less to reveals group features such as segregation, cracks, porosity or grain flow , is drive by: a. Grinding. b. Deep etching. c. Carburizing.
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