2 Diagnosis Angiokeratoma a Pathophysiology An angiokeratoma forms by a

2 diagnosis angiokeratoma a pathophysiology an

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2. Diagnosis: Angiokeratoma a. Pathophysiology: An angiokeratoma forms by a dilation of the vessel (Schiller & Itin, 1996). The cause is unknown (DermNet NZ, 2003). A lesion is formed because of a vessel that has become clotted extending into the papillary dermis and epidermis (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology [AOCD], n.d.). b. Description: Angiokeratomas are described as a vascular papule of one or more dilated blood vessels (Schiller & Itin, 1996). It appears as a small red-purple papule and can have a rough/scaly surface (DermNet NZ, 2003). Angiokeratomas can range in size of up to five millimeters (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology [AOCD], n.d.). Angiokeratomas feel hard and are non-blanchable (AOCD, n.d.). They are most commonly located on the legs, elbows, knees, scrotum, or vulva (AOCD, n.d.). c. Explanation: Angiokeratomas appear in individuals over the age of 40 and are asymptomatic (DermNet NZ, 2003). If trauma occurs to an angiokeratoma, a risk for bleeding can occur, eventually forming a harmless clot inside the papule, changing the color to a dark purple or black (DermNet NZ, 2003). Angiokeratomas are noted to be a red-purple color (AOCD, n.d.). Angiokeratoma is not likely the diagnosis as DH lesions appear as bright red-purple papules and are located on his torso, whereas angiokeratomas are dark purple or black and appear on legs, elbows, knees, or scrotum (AOCD, n.d.).
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SKIN DISORDERS 9 d. Guidelines: Since angiokeratomas appear similar to melanomas, the lesions are biopsied to confirm benign versus malignancy (AOCD, n.d.). Many patients do not need treatment for angiokeratomas (AOCD, n.d.). 3. Diagnosis: Venous Lake a. Pathophysiology: The cause of a venous lake is not well understood (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.). The most likely source is chronic sun damage causing the superficial veins to dilate, resulting in a dark blue papule (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.). b. Description: A venous lake is a small, dark blue-purple papule that can be located on the face, lips, ears, neck and the back of a hand (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.). The papule is asymptomatic but can be confused with melanoma (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.). c. Explanation: Venous lakes are a dark blue-purple papule that, if traumatized, has a risk for tenderness or bleeding (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.). The papule can be slightly elevated but soft and compressible (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.). A venous lake is not likely the diagnosis for DH since his lesions are located on his torso and appear as bright red papules and not dark blue- purple papules. d. Guidelines: Venous lakes are asymptomatic; therefore, removing the venous lake is only necessary for cosmetic reasons (American Osteopathic College of Dermatology, n.d.).
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  • Trigraph, Dermal and subcutaneous growths, Pyogenic granuloma, hemangioma

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