So clearly laid out a template for how a study should

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so clearly laid out a template for how a study should be designed and revealed the criteria necessary to confirm the learning styles hypothesis, researchers would have a blueprint, definitive guidelines for how to design their studies. The current investigation searched for this type of evidence in an attempt to evaluate whether a gap remains between research findings and the methods advocated in pre-service teacher education programs and those practiced in the classroom. Has new evidence, based on rigorous methodology, surfaced to support widespread learning style practices, or does the latest research con- tinue to suggest that learning styles instruction is a misguided and wasteful endeavor? It also went further and examined how learning styles are represented in teacher education textbooks, as this could potentially be one of the causes of the gap between research on the subject and its acceptance in practice. Texts The learning styles hypothesis is arguably more important to teacher education than any other field because what tens of thousands of pre-service teachers learn in certification programs and subsequently take with them into the classroom can potentially impact the instruction of millions of k-12 students over the decades they teach. But, like students in other undergraduate fields, undergraduate students in the field of education do the bulk of their assigned readings from textbooks and do not tend to read a great deal of peer- reviewed primary source research studies, which are usually not picked up en masse until the graduate level. For this reason, it is worth briefly examining how learning styles are portrayed in a number of textbooks common to teacher education programs. Both gen- eral education texts containing advice for pre-service undergraduate teacher candidates and undergraduate educational psychology texts were included, and their portrayals of the subject of learning styles are contrasted below. General teacher education texts All of the general teacher education texts reviewed for this article included sections on learning styles, most commonly in conjunction with a discussion of multiple intelligences,
314 Theory and Research in Education 13(3) and presented the topic as a way to differentiate instruction for learners. Some presented information on multiple intelligences and learning styles as if the two were synonymous, flowing seamlessly from one to the other (Hipsky, 2011; Silver et al., 2000). The model that was most frequently described was the sensory-based visual, auditory, kinesthetic, tactile (VAKT) framework (Carjuzaa and Kellough, 2013; Powell, 2012; Smith and Throne, 2009). One text used the 4MAT system in discussing learning styles, a model that encompasses experiences, viewing, doing, and exploring what-if questions (Wormeli, 2007). Another advocated for the Myers–Briggs model for math instruction, which includes mastery, understanding, self-expressive, and interpersonal domains (Smith and Throne, 2009).

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