E The balance between sand dug up from below by crabs and sand taken inland in

E the balance between sand dug up from below by crabs

This preview shows page 81 - 84 out of 142 pages.

 E) The balance between sand dug up from below by crabs, and sand taken inland in the shorts of small  beach-goers. Points Earned:  1.0/1.0 Correct Answer(s): C 4.  Hardy souls who visit beaches in the winter are often surprised by how different summer and winter  beaches really are. A typical change is (note: a breaking wave curls over and the top falls down, making  spectacular movie footage if a surfer is in the way; a surging wave hangs together and the top doesn’t fall  over):  A) Surging waves bring sand in during summer, and breaking waves take sand out during winter, so  summer beaches are large and sandy while winter beaches are small and rocky.  B) Surging waves bring sand in during summer, and breaking waves take sand out during winter, so  summer beaches are small and rocky while winter beaches are large and sandy.  C) Surging waves bring sand in during winter, and breaking waves take sand out during summer, so  summer beaches are large and sandy while winter beaches are small and rocky.  D) Surging waves bring sand in during winter, and breaking waves take sand out during summer, so  summer beaches are small and rocky while winter beaches are large and sandy.  E) Cape Cod beaches are taken over by nudists in winter. Feedback:  Winter beaches are eroded, as breaking waves bring their energy far inland through the air, and  the outgoing rush of water removes sand; surging summer waves replace that sand. And if you have ever  been in a Nor’easter on the Cape, even hardy nudists would be in danger of losing certain important  peripherals.
Image of page 81
Points Earned:  1.0/1.0 Correct Answer(s): A 5.  The Landsat above image from NASA shows Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  The short yellow arrow indicates sand deposits at Monomoy Island, a great place for bird-watching. The  long pink arrow indicates underwater sand deposits. The dotted blue arrow points to the great Outer Beach  of the Cape.  Based on material presented in this class, what is going on?  A) The outer beach (dotted blue) is losing sand to Monomoy (short yellow), which is losing sand to the undersea bars (long pink), which are losing sand to deeper water, as the Cape slowly shrinks.  B) The outer beach (dotted blue) is losing sand to Monomoy (short yellow), which is growing from  this extra sand and from sand brought up by storms from the underwater bars (long pink), as the Cape  grows overall.  C) The outer beach (dotted blue) is losing sand to deep water to the east, while Monomoy (short 
Image of page 82
yellow) is growing as sand is brought up by storms from the underwater bars (long pink), as the Cape  overall maintains the same size.  D) The ocean is “mining” sand from the underwater bars (long pink) and adding that sand to  Monomoy (short yellow), which is then eroded to supply sand to the Outer Beach (dotted blue), as the Cape grows overall.  E) All of the arrows actually indicate piles of peripherals lost by wintertime nudists sunbathing on the  Cape’s beaches. Feedback: 
Image of page 83
Image of page 84

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 142 pages?

  • Spring '12
  • ALLEY
  • The Land, Correct Answer, Death Valley, geologist

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture