Confusing species none current status commonwealth

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Confusing species: None. Current Status Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 : Not Listed Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995 : endangered Plate 6. Pneumatopteris pennigera : Figure 5. Pneumatopteris pennigera : King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 131
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habit ( Photograph: Matthew Larcombe) King Island distribution King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 132
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Existing Conservation Measures Pneumatopteris pennigera is listed as a priority species requiring consideration in the development of the private land component of the Tasmanian CAR reserve system (DPIWE 1998). The two subpopulations on King Island occur within Public Reserves that are being considered for Nature Reserve status under the Tasmanian Nature Conservation Act 2002 (CLAC Project Team 2005b). Targeted surveys for the species were undertaken by TSS personnel in 2007 and 2009 under the auspices of an NRM-funded threatened flora project (Larcombe & Garrett 2009, Wapstra et al. 2009). Distribution and Habitat Pneumatopteris pennigera occurs in Tasmania, Victoria and Queensland, and is also known from New Zealand (Duncan & Isaac 1986, Bostock 1998b). Like other species in the family Thelypteridaceae, Pneumatopteris pennigera is a terrestrial or swamp fern. In Australia the species occurs primarily on calcareous soils, hence its common name, whereas in New Zealand it shows no such affinity. Pneumatopteris pennigera is very rare in Victoria, having been first ‘discovered’ in the Otways as recently as 1943, and is currently known from the Glenelg River region in the State’s far southwest, and near Port Campbell (Duncan & Isaac 1986, Walsh & Entwisle 1994). In New Zealand Pneumatopteris pennigera is reportedly common near streams in lowland forest (Brownsey & Smith- Dodsworth 1989). Until recently, the largest Pneumatopteris pennigera population in Tasmania occurred at Copper Creek (a tributary of the Duck River in the State’s northwest), with smaller stands along two creeks flowing into the Arthur River, and along the lower reaches of the Ettrick and Pass Rivers on King Island (Figure 5). Pneumatopteris pennigera was collected from the Duck River and Mole Creek areas in the early 1900s, though searches by fern enthusiasts in the period since have failed to relocate these sites. The linear range of extant sites in Tasmania is 165 km, with an extent of occurrence 3,900 km 2 (which includes large areas of sea), and an area of occupancy of less than 2.5 ha. On King Island the species grows on riverbanks, where it is strongly associated with limey springs. At the Ettrick River site it occurs under a canopy of Leptospermum lanigerum (woolly teatree), with Pteris tremula (tender brake), Blechnum chambersii (lance waterfern), Blechnum wattsii , (hard waterfern), Lastreopsis acuminata (shiny shieldfern), Tetragonia implexicoma (bower spinach) and Carex appressa (tall sedge).
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