2012 It has also been found that the use of restraints has increased the risk

2012 it has also been found that the use of

This preview shows page 4 - 6 out of 7 pages.

increased the risk patient injury. It is unclear per the scenario as to why exactly the patient is in restraints; but the nurse would have consulted with the provider to determine the necessity of the restraints. She also could have suggested other alternatives to restraints, such as making sure patient’s room is close to the nurses station, frequent checks, and full assessment to meet patient’s needs. If the nurse had understood nursing-sensitive indicators, when she was told to, “Just keep it quiet. It will be okay” by her nursing supervisor regarding the mix up of patient’s food, she would have advocated for the patient to do what was right for Mr. J. She would have understood the importance of explaining the event of the mix up of the regular meat to the patient, apologized, and reassurance that it will not happen again. Overall, if the nursing staff hadan understanding of nursing-sensitive indicators, Mr.’s hospitalization would have prevented the use of restraints, prevented a pressure ulcer, and would have improved patient satisfaction ratings. C. Analyze the specific system resources, referrals, or colleagues that you, as the nursing shift supervisor, could use to resolve the ethical issue in this scenario.As a nursing shift supervisor in Mr. J’s case, there are many referrals and resources I would have relied on to better his care. To start, with the scenario we are provided, it mentions
Background image
the patient has mild dementia, but he is able to answer simple questions appropriately, and nowhere was it mentioned that he may be of harm to himself or others. It is hard to determine why this patient is in restraints. Instead of restraints one option would have been to make sure hisroom was in a well-lighted room close to the nursing station in order to ensure an easier watch ofpatient. If concern was that he would fall out of bed, there are padded devices that could be placed below patient’s bed. Also, sometimes the use of bed/chair alarms to alert staff when a patient is getting up or needing assistance can also replace the use of restraints. It is also clear in this scenario that the nursing staff is not making appropriate rounds. As nursing supervisor I would be sure that hourly rounds were being completed on all patients to ensure patient’s needs were being met. All patients that are in bed or in a chair for an increased amount of time are at
Background image
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Fall '14
  • Reagan,Paul
  • Nursing, Florence Nightingale, nursing-sensitive indicators

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture