Self awareness isnt one of those big marquee

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Self-awareness isn’t one of those big marquee leadership qualities like vision, charisma, strategic thinking or the ability to speak eloquently to an audience the size of a small city, but it’s a quieter ancillary quality that enables the high-octane ones to work. To use a chemistry concept, it’s a psychological catalyst. Over the years it has been seen numerous executive careers derailed by lack of self-awareness. Individuals felt they were omnipotent and took crazy risks or didn’t recognize when actions that felt authoritative were actually demoralizing or in general didn’t have an accurate “read” on how others were decoding the messages they were sending. On the other hand, the most effective executives had realistic assessments of their own abilities – their strengths and weaknesses, their effect on others, the gaps that needed to be filled. How should a company use this type of data? Predicting executive success (particularly when one is hiring from the outside) is always, to understate, a tricky business. The Green Peak study noted: “Companies and their investors need to put more effort into evaluating the interpersonal strengths of potential leaders. They should focus more on how a leadership candidate does the work, and not focus exclusively on what he or she has done… However, there are limits to the degree to which an individual can improve his or her basic ability to interact well with others. This means that focusing on interpersonal skills when selecting the right candidate becomes critical.” Developing Self-awareness Self-awareness and successful management Page 13
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Self awareness is developed through practices in focusing our attention on the details of our personality and behavior. It isn’t learned from reading a book. When we read a book we are focusing our attention on the conceptual ideas in the book. We can develop an intellectual understanding of the ideas of self awareness from a book, but this is not the same. With our attention in a book we are practicing not paying attention to our own behavior, emotions and personality. There are ways in which people can develop self-awareness on their own. However, coaching can be a better way of helping people view their own actions and reactions objectively, so it's useful for helping people to build self-awareness. In this paper we'll look at six approaches that you can use to help others build this self- awareness. Approach 1: Using Psychometric Tests Psychometric tests are useful for giving people an objective view of how they behave, and how they compare in outlook with others. The answers they give categorize them by the personality traits or preferences they show, and then provide some commentary on these. Of course, none of these tools captures the richness and uniqueness of an individual person. But they can point out the similarities and differences between people.
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