This being said seeing a specialist in the US and Japan is vastly different For

This being said seeing a specialist in the us and

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This being said seeing a specialist in the US and Japan is vastly different. For a patient in the US to see a specialist requires a referral from a general practitioner or primary care provider. There is usually a long wait as in specialist are hard to get into and require insurance approval. Also, in the US the government puts stipulations on what they deem
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5 necessary for a person to do or try before seeing a certain specialist. Japan on the contrary, allows its citizens to see any specialist they desire with no restrictions on pre-authorizations or stipulations. If a person in Japan feels they can figure out what they need they are allowed to go to whom they prefer and, in most cases, can be seen that day as a walk-in patient (TransferWise, 2017). A2C: COVERAGE FOR PREEXISTING CONDITIONS Surprisingly coverage for preexisting health conditions are similar in the United States and Japan. In both countries law states that no one can be turned down or refused treatment to preexisting health conditions or economic status. In Japan this law is straight forward and there are not any exceptions. In the United States there is a grandfathered clause that states if you purchased a grandfathered individual health insurance policy for yourself or your family on or before March 23, 2010 that has not been changed in any specific way that reduces benefits or increase costs to consumers then the pre-existing coverage rule does not apply. Meaning that person would not receive preexisting coverage and would then rely on the grandfathered health insurance (HHS Office, 2017). A3: FINANCE IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTHCARE DELIVERY As mentioned above the Affordable Care Act was put into place while President Obama was in office. While there have been some who have benefited from this act there have also been significant impacts for many patients in the United States. Of these impacts there has been rising premiums. Premiums have been increased anywhere from 11.3 percent to 13.8 percent depending on what plan an individual carry. Another financial implication that has impacted the
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6 US is rising deductibles. Meaning a patient has to meet a higher financial standard before the insurance will kick in and help with a percentage of the remaining cost. Both rising premiums and rising deductibles have led to the shift of taxpayers picking up the bill for those cost increases and lower income families paying less. One financial positive regarding Americans is the requirement for health payers to fully cover preventive services such as mammograms and immunizations.
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