Tritone the term used for the 4 or its enharmonic

Info icon This preview shows pages 2–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Tritone: The term used for the +4 or its enharmonic equivalent, the (5. Interval Inversion: When one puts the lower note above the upper one (or the reverse). Consonant: Pleasing to the ear. Dissonant: Not pleasing to the ear. Bass: The lowest voice. Rhythm: A general term used to refer to the time aspect of music, as contrasted with the pitch aspect. Dot: Always adds to the duration one-half the value of the note, rest, or dot that precedes it. Beat: The basic pulse of a musical passage. Tempo: The rate at which the beat occurs. Meter: The pattern of beats. Measures: The groups of beats. Bar Line: A notation indicating the end of a measure, depicted by a vertical line through the staff. Duple, Triple and Quadruple: Refers to the number of beats in each measure. Duple Meter: Two-beat measure: Strong-weak. Triple Meter: Three-beat measure: Strong-weak-weak. Quadruple Meter: Four-beat measure: Strong-weak-less strong - weak. Metric Accent: The pattern of stresses. Division of the Beat: Durations in a musical passage that are shorter than the beat. Simple Beat: Beats divided into two equal parts. Compound: Beat Beats divided into three equal parts.
Image of page 2

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Time Signature: A symbol that tells the performer how many beats will occur in each measure, what note value will represent the beat, and whether the beat is simple or compound. Grouplet (or tuplet): Refers to the division of an undotted value into some number of equal parts other than two, four, eight, and so on or the division of a dotted value into some number of equal parts other than three, six, twelve, and so on. Beams: Used to connect durations shorter than a quarter note when the durations occur within the same beat Tertian: A chord structure built of thirds. Triad: A three-note chord consisting of a 5th divided into two superimposed 3rds. The bottom note of the 5th is the root, and the top note is the 5th. Seventh Chord (M7): A triad with another 3rd added above the 5th of the triad. The added note is a 7th above the root. Major-Minor Chord (Mm7): Major triad with a m7 above the root. Minor Seventh Chord (m7): Minor triad with a m7 above the root. Bass Position: The chord member that is in the lowest sounding voice. Root Position: A chord with the root notated as the lowest tone. Inversion: The transfer of the lowest note to some higher octave. First Inversion: A chord with the 3rd as the lowest tone. Second Inversion: A chord with the 5th in the bass. Third Inversion: A seventh chord with the 7th as the lowest tone. Figured Bass: A method of abbreviated notation used in the Baroque era. Lead Sheet Symbols: Used in jazz and most popular music to indicate chords to be played under a given melody. Pitch Classes: Term used to group together all pitches that have an identical sound or that are identical except for the octave or octaves that separate
Image of page 3
them. Major Seventh Chord (M7): Major triad with a M7 above the root. Diatonic Chords made up only of notes from the scale on which the passage is based. Altered or Chromatic Chords using notes not in the scale. Harmonic Progression The ways in which chords are selected.
Image of page 4

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern