Driving force behind founding of maryland was sir

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-Driving force behind founding of Maryland was Sir George Calvert, later Lord Baltimore. oCalvert, a talented and well-educated man, enjoyed the patronage of James IoAwarded lucrative positions in the government, the most important being the king’s secretary of state.o1625, Calvert publicly declared his Catholicism; in this fiercely anti-Catholic society, persons who openly supported Church of Rome were immediately stripped of civil office.oAlthough Calvert forced to resign as secretary of state, Calvert retained the crown’s favor.-Before resigning, Calvert sponsored a settlement on the coast of Newfoundland, but after visiting it, he concluded that no English person, whatever his or her religion, would transfer to a place where the “ayre [is] so intolerably cold”. oTurned his attention to the Chesapeake. June 30, 1632, Charles I granted George Calvert’s son, Cecilius, a charter for a colony to be located north of Virginia.Boundaries of the settlement, named Maryland in honor of Charles’s queen, were vaguely defined. Generated legal controversies not fully resolved until 1760s when Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon surveyed their famous boundary line between Pennsylvania and Maryland.-Cecilius, second Lord Baltimore, wanted to create a sanctuary for England’s persecuted Catholics.
oIntended to make money.oWithout Protestant settlers, unlikely Maryland would prosper, and Cecilius instructed his brother Leonard, the colony’s governor, to do nothing that might frighten off hypersensitive Protestants.Governor ordered acts of Roman Catholic Religion to be done as privately as may be.oMarch 25, 1634, the Arkand the Dove, carrying about 150 settlers, landed safely, and within days, the governor purchased from the Yaocomico Indians a village that became St. Mary’s City, the first capital of Maryland.-Colony’s charter was a throwback to an earlier feudal age.oTransformed Lord Baltimore into a “palatine lord,” a proprietor with almost royal powers.Settlers swore an oath of allegiance not to the king of England but to Lord Baltimore.In England, such practices had long ago been abandoned.As the proprietor, Lord Baltimore owned outright almost six million acres and had absolute authority over anyone living in his domain.-On paper, at least, everyone in Maryland was assigned a place in an elaborate social hierarchy. oMembers of a colonial ruling class, persons who purchased 6000 acres from Baltimore, were called lords of the manor.Aristocrats permitted to establish local courts of law. oPeople holding less acreage enjoyed fewer privileges, particularly in government.oBaltimore figured that land sales and rents would finance entire venture.-Baltimore’s feudal system never took root in Chesapeake soil.

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