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Invalid not deductively valid even strong inductive

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invalidNot deductively valid. Even strong inductive arguments are deductively invalid.multiple argumentationA passage containing more than one argument.premiseA claim that is used as a reason in an argument.premise indicatorsWords or phrases that signal the presence of premises but not conclusions.Examples: Because, since, for the reason that.standard formA single argument rewritten with its basic premises above the line and itsconclusion below the line. The premises and conclusion should be expressed as completesentences. Pronouns should be replaced with their antecedents (the nouns themselves) whereverpossible. The order of the premises is not important. Indicator words and other fluff words arestripped away. When an argument is in standard form, it is supposed to stand alone witheverything significant stated explicitly so that the reader can view the whole argument andunderstand what it is without needing additional information from the context.sub-conclusionThe conclusion of an argument that occurs among other arguments.
70ExercisesGeneral Exercises1. If two people disagree with each other, then one of them is not a critical thinker.a. trueb. false■ 2. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food andDrug Administration, the fourmajor food groups are corn, pork, beer, and Jell-O salad with marshmallows. Which food groupis preferred by future Italian diplomats?a. cornb. porkc. beerd. Jell-O salad with marshmallows.413. Consider each of the following four sentences and say whether they would typically be usedto make a statement or not to make a statement:Where is it? There it is! Watch out! It's coming toward us too fast!4. Ok, you math geniuses, a farmer had 17 sheep, and all but 9 died. Then the farmer was given 2from his brother but both died.How many of the farmer's sheep were left? [Hint: Not 8.]5. Briefly describe what is going on in the following paragraph by answering these questions:What is its main purpose? Is there an argument? Is anything explained? What? Is there anydescription? The paragraph is about Catherine the Great’s wedding in Russia in 1745. She was asixteen-year-old bride-to-be of the seventeen-year-old future emperor.Catherine’s premarital nervousness did not come from fear of the nocturnal intimaciesthat marriage would demand. She knew nothing about these things. Indeed, on the eve ofher marriage, she was so innocent that she did not know how the two sexes physicallydiffered. Nor had she any idea what mysterious acts were performed when a woman laydown with a man. Who did what? How? She questioned her young ladies, but they wereas innocent as she. One June night, she staged an impromptu slumber party in herbedroom, covering the floor with mattresses, including her own. Before going to sleep,the eight flustered and excited young women discussed what men were like and howtheir bodies were formed. No one had any specific information; indeed, their talk was soill-informed, incoherent, and unhelpful that Catherine said that in the morning she wouldask her mother. She did so, but Johannaherself married at fifteenrefused to answer.

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Term
Fall
Professor
Matthew Howery
Tags
Philosophy, Logic, Juanita, Emilio

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