Research report - National Child Labour Action Programme for South Africa (1).doc

The government also approved a programme in terms of

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cooking on an electric stove. The government also approved a programme in terms of which consumers in remote sparsely populated areas that could not be linked to the grid would get a limited amount of electricity generated through solar panels. Again, this would be sufficient for basic lighting, running a small black and white TV and a small radio, but not sufficient for cooking or even boiling water. A subsidy of R40 per month per household would be paid to the provider – the household having to bear the difference between the subsidy and the actual cost, about R18. Local government is responsible for implementation of the EBSST with the aid of guidelines and policies from national government. The Free Basic Electricity programme was piloted and then cabinet had to decide on the details for implementation. This programme started roll out on 1 July 2003 with a first allocation of R300 million flowing to municipalities via DPLG as part of the equitable share subsidy. Households that cannot afford to cook with electricity or do not have access to it, need to use alternative fuels, such as paraffin, LP, gas or wood. There are no government subsidies for these fuels, although since April 2001 paraffin has been zero-rated for value added tax. The fact that children were found to spend so much time collecting fuel indicates that many families, certainly in ex-homeland areas, use very little paraffin or other purchased sources of energy for cooking. This is either because there is no supply close by or they do not have sufficient funds to buy it.
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Page 50 Proposed action – by forms of harm Draft 4,10 Oct 2003 In 2002 a single national maximum retail price for paraffin was introduced. DME and NT are assessing the efficacy of these interventions in reaching the intended beneficiaries. The DME has also initiated a study to determine whether it will be viable to regulate the price of LP gas at the wholesale and/or retail level. The following action outlined here would help to reduce the amount of child work involved in households’ access to energy for daily livings: (64) Government should widen access to the alternative commercial fuels by expanding the provision of energy through the concept of integrated energy centres or energy shops . If they are located close to households in remote areas, these shops could sell paraffin, gas, wood, solar cooking equipment, or other sources of energy. People are likely to choose the form of energy most suitable to them, in many cases relieving the pressure on children to fetch fuel from far away. Lead institution: DME . Secondary institution: LG. New policy? Elaboration of existing policy. Once off cost: moderate. Recurrent cost: moderate. Time line: within 3 years of adoption of policy.’ 5.6 Paid domestic work Paid domestic work should have been captured in the SAYP in response to the question as to whether the child had done any work for a wage, salary or any payment in kind. Overall, 1,8% of children aged 5-17 years – or 247 000 children – said they had done such work, and 1,4% – or 183 000 children – said they had done so for three or more hours a week. A total of 49 000 children were doing paid work
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