Gravitational redshift The reddening of light from a very massive object caused

Gravitational redshift the reddening of light from a

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Gravitational redshift The reddening of light from a very massive object caused by photons escaping and traveling away from the object’s strong gravitational field. An example of gravitational redshift is light escaping from the surface of a neutron star. Gravity (gravitational force) The attractive force between all masses in the universe. All objects that have mass possess a gravitational force that attracts all other masses. The more massive the object, the stronger the gravitational force. The closer objects are to each other, the stronger the gravitational attraction. Gravity assist An effect through which an orbiting object, such as a spacecraft or a comet, gains or loses speed by virtue of the gravitational might of a planet or other celestial object that it passes. For example, the Cassini spacecraft in its journey to Saturn used a gravity assist from Earth to increase its velocity by about 36,000 kilometers per hour (22,300 miles per hour). GRB 990123 One of the most energetic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever detected, occurring at 4:47 a.m. EST, January 23, 1999. The “burst” equaled the power of nearly 10 million billion suns. It became the first GRB to be viewed simultaneously in both gamma-ray and optical wavelengths. Great Red Spot A circulating storm located in Jupiter’s upper atmosphere. The storm, which rotates around the planet in six days, is the width of two to three Earths. Galileo first observed the spot in the 17th century. Greenhouse effect The result of a planet’s atmosphere trapping infrared heat, rather than allowing it to escape into space. This effect increases the planet’s surface temperature, a phenomenon known as global warming. Ground state The minimum energy state of an atom that is achieved when all of its electrons have the lowest possible energy and therefore are as close to the nucleus as possible. Group of galaxies A small collection of galaxies bound together by gravity. The number of galaxies in a group can range from a few to dozens. The Milky Way is a member of the Local Group, a collection of more than 30 galaxies. Guide star A star that a telescopes guidance system locks onto to ensure that a celestial object is followed and observed as the telescope moves, owing either to the Earths rotation or the telescopes orbital trajectory. The Hubble Space Telescope uses two of its three Fine Guidance Sensors to detect and lock onto guide stars. The telescopes science operations center has more than 15 million guide stars in its database the Guide Star Catalogue. Gyroscope A spinning wheel mounted on a movable frame that assists in stabilizing and pointing a space-based observatory. Gyroscopes are important because they measure the rate of motion as the observatory moves and help ensure the telescope retains correct pointing during observations. The gyroscopes provide the general pointing of the telescope while the fine guidance sensors provide the fine tuning. Gyroscopes are used in navigational instruments for aircraft, satellites, and ships. The Hubble Space Telescope has six gyroscopes for navigation and sighting purposes.
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