2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study Mathematics.pdf

Tell and write time represent and interpret data

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Tell and write time. Represent and interpret data. Geometry [G] Reason with shapes and their attributes. 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
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2016 Revised Alabama Course of Study: Mathematics 17 GRADE 1 In Grade 1, instructional time should focus on four critical areas. These areas are (1) developing understanding of addition, subtraction, and strategies for addition and subtraction within 20; (2) developing understanding of whole number relationships and place value, including grouping in tens and ones; (3) developing understanding of linear measurement and measuring lengths as iterating length units; and (4) reasoning about attributes of, and composing and decomposing geometric shapes. Important information regarding these four critical areas of instruction follows: (1) Students develop strategies for adding and subtracting whole numbers based on prior work with small numbers. They use a variety of models, including discrete objects and length-based models such as cubes connected to form lengths; to model add-to, take-from, put-together, take-apart, and compare situations to develop meaning for the operations of addition and subtraction; and to develop strategies to solve arithmetic problems with these operations. Students understand connections between counting and addition and subtraction such as adding two is the same as counting on two. They use properties of addition to add whole numbers and to create and use increasingly sophisticated strategies based on these properties such as “making tens” to solve addition and subtraction problems within 20. By comparing a variety of solution strategies, students build their understanding of the relationship between addition and subtraction. (2) Students develop, discuss, and use efficient, accurate, and generalizable methods to add within 100 and subtract multiples of 10. They compare whole numbers, at least to 100, to develop understanding of and solve problems involving their relative sizes. They think of whole numbers between 10 and 100 in terms of tens and ones, especially recognizing the numbers 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and some ones. Through activities that build number sense, they understand the order of the counting numbers and their relative magnitudes. (3) Students develop an understanding of the meaning and processes of measurement, including underlying concepts such as iterating, the mental activity of building up the length of an object with equal-sized units, and the transitivity principle for indirect measurement. Students should apply the principle of transitivity of measurement to make indirect comparisons, although they need not use this technical term.
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