Advocates that protest the HPV vaccine argue that mandating a vaccine for young

Advocates that protest the hpv vaccine argue that

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both sides of the line. Advocates that protest the HPV vaccine argue that mandating a vaccine foryoung adults who are practicing abstinence for religion seems unreasonable in addition to sending mixed signals to teenagers on the matter. Individuals believe that the only way to preventsexually transmitted diseases and unwanted pregnancies is through abstinence, but by the government wanting to mandate this vaccine they are showing these young adults another means 7
of protection in which they can participate in sexual behavior and still be okay. The greatest risk with this vaccine is that young adults are going to be misguided and engage in sexual behavior without understand the full consequences. Representative Jo Ann Davis of Virginia said:We need to yell it to the top of the rooftops that these condoms we’re sending down toyou don’t protect you… [You] have a false sense of security. So, I think we’re sendingthe wrong message when we use taxpayer dollars to give condoms out to these kids and we don’t tell them, ‘By the way, you’ll probably be dead at age 24 by cervical cancer. But we’re giving you condoms, so do your thing.’ To me, abstinence is the only way. (Vamos, 2008) Basically, Jo Ann Davis is pointing out the obvious that we are giving children condoms so they practice safe sex, but condoms do not protect individuals from contracting sexually transmitted infections. Sure, the chances have decreased greatly with the use of condoms, but the risk is still present. The best way to protect children is if they receive a clear and consistent message that absence is the best way to protect one’s sexual health. On the contrary, national data suggest that current approaches such as the abstinence-only-until-marriage programs are showing very little improvement of sexual behaviors in high schoolers (Ohri, 2007). In fact, the findings show that current approaches show very little improvement of sexual behaviors after middle school. One study conducted by Congress, looked at 4 different government funded sexual abstinence programs. The results for this experiment showed that there is no benefit of abstinence programs. As a matter of fact, participates in both programs experienced sexual activity four to six years after these programs ended. The average age of when participates had their first sexual experience stated at age 15 (Trenholm, 2007). Having said that, mandating vaccine can help eradicate cervical cancer and decrease the spread of certain HPV strains. Religious leaders and parents argue that it seems unreasonable to mandate a vaccine when children are practicing abstinence, but how about for young adults who are underprivileged, underinsured, and uninsured who should have access to affordable healthcare for vaccines. If schools mandate this vaccine, then this will motivate policy makers 8
and improve the access of the HPV vaccine to underprivileged areas through government programs like Vaccines for Children (VFC) (Ohri, 2007). Moreover, the idea behind childhood immunizations is this concept of “one-size-fits all” because it increases the chances of herd immunity for children who cannot get vaccinated due to

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