The severity of involvement of upper and lower motor

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The severity of involvement of upper and lower motor neuron is variable. In motor neuron disease, the neurological deficit is purely motor : (No sensory involvement) 139
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Motor neuron disease is characterized by involvement of: Either upper motor neurons  Corticospinal tract. or Lower motor neuron  Ant. Horn of spinal cord. or Both 140
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Clinical manifestation of motor neuron disease:- Manifestation are variable depending upon the predominant involvement of various neurons: 142
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There is no bladder bowel involvement in MND. In MND the neurogical deficit is purely motor (there is no sensory involvement) . There is no pseudohypertrophy of muscles rather progressive muscular atrophy is seen. Occular motility is spared. Fasciculation is the most common symptom. 146
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Which is pathognomic for motor neuron disease - a) Fasciculation (Dec 95) b) Bladder, bowel involvement c) Pseudohypertrophy d) Sensory loss in patchy manner A 147
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Q) A middle aged man presents with progressive atrophy and weakness of hands and forearms. On examination he is found to have slight spasticity of the legs, generalized hyper-reflexia and increased signal in the cortico-spinal tracts on T2 weighted MRI. The most likely diagnosis is - (MIMSNov 2004) a) Multiple selerosis b) Amyotrophic latetal sclerosis c) Subacute combined degeneration d) Progressive spinal muscular atrophy 148
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It is a case of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Motor neuron disease). In motor neuron disease there is degeneration of motor neurons, either upper motor neuron or lower motor neurons or both. Motor neurons of both, the corticospinal tract and cranial nuclei can be involved. It is characteristic of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, that regardless of whether the initial disease involves the upper or lower motor neurons both will eventually be implicated. 149
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Diagnosis:- Axial T2 weighted MRI scan through the lateral ventricle of the brain reveals abnormal high signal intensity within the corticospinal tracts. 150
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Q) A middle aged man presents with progressive atrophy and weakness of hands and forearms. On examination he is found to have slight spasticity of the legs, generalized hyper-reflexia and increased signal in the cortico-spinal tracts on T2 weighted MRI. The most likely diagnosis is - (MIMSNov 2004) a) Multiple selerosis b) Amyotrophic latetal sclerosis c) Subacute combined degeneration d) Progressive spinal muscular atrophy 151
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Spastic paraplegia can be caused by the following except- (AI09) a) Motor neuron disease b) Chronic lead poisoning c) Vitamin B12 deficiency d) Cervical spondylosis 152
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Upper and lower motor neuron injuries result in different clinical signs:- - Upper motor neuron lesions produces  Spastic paralysis.
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  • Winter '16
  • jean grey

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