It can be inferred that Slope is A the chaplain D a politician B the Bishop E a

It can be inferred that slope is a the chaplain d a

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101. It can be inferred that Slope is A. the chaplain D. a politicianB. the Bishop E. a young writer C. a foreigner 102. The word ‘equanimity’ (line 41) most nearly means103. It can be inferred that Mr Harding is especially disturbedbecause he‘rubbish’ 104. Mr. Harding differs from others of his ‘school’ (line 49)because they105. The tone of the sentence 'New men....live' isA. objective B. ironic C. derogatory D. expository E. ambivalent A stout old lady was walking with her basket down the middleof a street in Petrograd to the great confusion of the traffic andwith no small peril to herself. It was pointed out to her that thepavement was the place for pedestrians, but she replied: 'I'mgoing to walk where I like. We've got liberty now.' It did notoccur to the dear old lady that if liberty entitled the pedestrianto walk down the middle of the road, then the end of suchliberty would be universal chaos. Everybody would be gettingin everybody else's way and nobody would get anywhere. Individual liberty would have become social anarchy.There is a danger of the world getting liberty-drunk in thesedays like the old lady with the basket, and it is just as well toremind ourselves of what the rule of the road means. It meansthat in order that the liberties of all may be preserved, theliberties of everybody must be curtailed. When the policeman,say, at Piccadilly Circus steps into the middle of the road andputs out his hand, he is the symbol not of tyranny, but ofliberty.You may not think so. You may, being in a hurry, and seeingyour car pulled up by this insolence of office, feel that yourliberty has been outraged. How dare this fellow interfere withyour free use of the public highway? Then, if you are areasonable person, you will reflect that if he did not interferewith you, he would interfere with no one, and the result wouldbe that Piccadilly Circus would be a maelstrom that you wouldnever cross at all. You have submitted to a curtailment ofprivate liberty in order that you may enjoy a social orderwhich makes your liberty a reality.Liberty is not a personal affair only, but a social contract. Itis an accommodation of interests. In matters which do nottouch anybody else's liberty, of course, I may be as free as Ilike. If I choose to go down the road in a dressing-gown whoshall say me nay? You have liberty to laugh at me, but I haveliberty to be indifferent to you. And if I have a fancy fordyeing my hair, or waxing my moustache (which heavenforbid), or wearing an overcoat and sandals, or going to bedlate or getting up early, I shall follow my fancy and ask noman's permission. I shall not inquire of you whether I may eatmustard with my mutton. And you will not ask me whetheryou may follow this religion or that, whether you may prefer

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