Ownership where a corporation owns the building and

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ownership where a corporation owns the building and the residents own shares in the corporation, owners may not sell their shares or sublease without approval of the other owners). modern variances to concurrent ownership differ from standard tenancies in that the tenant cannot sell their interest/share without approval from the co-tenants.
Comments: Question 2 . Question : What are the rights held by the owner of a life estate? What happens to ownership of the property when the life estate ends? What rights typically pass from the life estate that has ended, and what is the formal name, under the law, of anyone receiving those rights?
Comments: Question 3 . Question : How does a nonpossessory interest vary from a possessory interest? What is an easement and how do the various easements—easement appurtenant, easement in gross, license, and profit-a-prendre— operate? How are zoning ordinances interwoven with the possessory interests? What factors does zoning address, and are there exceptions to the decisions of the zoning boards? Student Answer: A nonpossessory interest is a situation where a person holds interest in another's real property without actually owning part of the property, versus a where the owner has a present possessory interest . An easement is an interest in land that gives the holder the right to make limited use of another's property without taking anything from it. Typical easements are common driveways, party walls, and rights-of-way. Easements can be expressly created by grant (where an owner gives another party an easement across his or her property) or reservation (where an owner sells land that he or she owns but reserves an easement on the land). Easement can also be implied by (1) implication, where an owner subdivides a piece of property with a well, path, road, or other beneficial appurtenant that serves the entire parcel, or by (2) necessity—for example, where "landlocked" property has an implied easement across surrounding property to enter and exit the landlocked property. Easements can also be created by prescription— that is, by adverse possession. Easement appurtenant is a situation created when the owner of one piece of land is given an easement over an adjacent piece of land. Easement in gross authorizes a person who does not own adjacent land the right to use another person's land. License is a document that grants a person the right to enter upon another's property for a specified and usually short period of time. a

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