Chapter 27 dead peter has his gold 1 what is the

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Chapter 27: Dead Peter Has His Gold 1. What is the significance of the duke and the dauphin blaming the departed slaves for the missing gold? Chapter 28: Overreaching Don’t Pay 1. How does Huck Finn resolve the conflict in this episode? Why can’t Huck tell the complete truth? Chapter 29: I Light Out in the Storm 1. This chapter gets confusing because Peter Wilks’ real brothers arrive. Why aren’t they able to convince the townsfolk of their real identities? 2. Huck Finn nearly cries when he and Jim aren’t able to leave the duke and the dauphin behind. Why is Huck so upset? Chapter 30: The Gold Saves the Thieves
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Huck Finn Reading Guide Ms. Smith 1. What type of irony does Mark Twain use in this chapter? (Verbal, dramatic, situational.) How does the irony create humor? What rhetorical appeal is humor? Chapter 31: You Can’t Pray a Lie 1. What happens to Jim? How was this foreshadowed earlier in the novel? 2. Do you believe Huck Finn when complains to the duke about selling Jim out from under him? That is to say, do you as a reader believe that Huck’s words are sincere, or do you think he’s catering his speech to his audience, which soundly believes that slaves are the property of white men? Chapter 32: I Have a New Name 1. This chapter begins the novel’s episode leading up to the climax of the story. It also begins the episode that best demonstrates the novel’s adherence to picaresque , which is a style of writing in which the author strings together a series of hapless adventures by a roguish hero. (You might want to re-read Mark Twain’s notice.) What is the major coincidence that develops at the end of this chapter and neatens the plot? Chapter 33: The Pitiful Ending of Royalty 1. Compare and contrast Tom Sawyer’s style of lying with Huck Finn’s. How do you think Tom Sawyer would have handled Huck’s adventures, had he been traveling with Jim? 2. Why is Huck Finn shocked when Tom Sawyer says that he’ll help Huck steal Jim from Uncle Silas and Aunt Sally? What does this tell you about Huck’s character development over the course of the story? Is he a dynamic character (yet)? Chapter 34: We Cheer Up Jim 1. What stereotypes of slaves does Mark Twain use in this chapter? How do these stereotypes function in the text as satire? What is Mark Twain satirizing? Chapter 35: Dark, Deep-laid Plans 1. How do Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer each approach freeing Jim? What elements of Tom Sawyer’s plan are humorous, and why? Are there any parallels to Tom Sawyer’s Gang at the beginning of the novel? Chapter 36: Trying to Help Jim
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Huck Finn Reading Guide Ms. Smith 1. How does Tom Sawyer’s storybook version of prison escapes satirize the Underground Railroad (escape of slaves to the northern states)? 2. What does Huck Finn mean when he says that Tom Sawyer “was always just that particular” and “full of principle”? Chapter 37: Jim Gets His Witch-Pie 1. What trick do Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer play on Aunt Sally? 2. What kind of irony (verbal, dramatic, or situational) does this chapter use?
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