pedagogy see for example Greenall Gough et al 1993 A Gough 1997 and have

Pedagogy see for example greenall gough et al 1993 a

This preview shows page 4 - 5 out of 13 pages.

pedagogy (see, for example, Greenall Gough et al., 1993; A. Gough, 1997) and have followed the guiding prin- ciples for environmental education from the Tbilisi conference—that “Environmental edu- cation should consider the environment in its totality—natural and built, technological and social (economic, political, technologi- cal, cultural-historical, moral, aesthetic)” (UN- ESCO, 1978, p. 27)—and pursued a more holistic approach, recognizing the need for changing approaches to curriculum, pedagogy, and school operations in order to achieve the goals of environmental education (N. Gough, 1992; Department of Education Queensland, 1993; Education Victoria, 1998; NSW DET, 2001). During the 1990s education for sustain- ability (or sustainable development) emerged as a successor to environmental education. For example, the Education chapter of Agenda 21 , the report of the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Develop- ment (UNCED), has as its priority “reorienting education towards sustainable development” and argues that (UNCED, 1992, Chapter 36, p. 2): Education is critical for promoting sustainable devel- opment and improving the capacity of the people to address environment and development issues . . . It is also critical for achieving environmental and ethical awareness, values and attitudes, skills and behaviour consistent with sustainable development and for effec- tive public participation in decision-making. Education for sustainable development (ESD) 3 has a broader focus than environmen- tal education in that it “recognises that human rights and social justice are just as essential to sustainable development as environmental sus- tainability” (Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, 2004, p. 49). It still has much in common with earlier conceptions of environ- mental education, including objectives encour- aging critical thinking, values analysis and ac- tive citizenship in environmental contexts, but differs in that ESD is “ultimately about educa- tion and capacity building and only secondly about environmental problem-solving” (Fien, 2001, p. 19). The broader vision of ESD outlined in UNESCO Decade of Education for Sustainable Development documents, and on the website, is very much one of quality education: “The basic vision of the DESD is a world where everyone has the opportunity to benefit from education and learn the values, behaviour and lifestyles required for a sustainable future and for posi- tive societal transformation.” (UNESCO, 2004b, p. 4, emphasis in original), and ESD mirrors the concern for education of high qual- ity, demonstrating characteristics : such as: Interdisciplinary and holistic: learning for sus- tainable development embedded in the whole curriculum, not as a separate subject; 3 AccordingtoLang(2004,p.7),educationforsustain- able development and education for sustainability should not be used interchangeably “as the concepts encode dif- ferent emphases;” “education for sustainable development focuses on the learning process required to support sustain- able development” whereas “education for sustainability has its emphasis in building capacity to live more sustainably.”
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 13 pages?

  • Summer '20
  • Dr joseph
  • The Land, Sustainable Schools

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes