interior of the Church of Santo Spirito We see the division between ceiling and

Interior of the church of santo spirito we see the

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interior of the Church of Santo Spirito We see the division between ceiling and walls because of the changes in lightness, darkness, and texture
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Artwork: CLAMP, Tsubasa RESERVoir CHRoNiCLE 1.1.3 CLAMP, page from the Tsubasa RESERVoir CHRoNiCLE , volume 21, page 47, 2007
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PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.1 Line, Shape, and the Principle of Contrast Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts , Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn Shields CLAMP, page from the Tsubasa RESERVoir CHRoNiCLE Line can communicate direction and movement Directional lines focus our attention on different sections The strong diagonal lines add an intense feeling of movement
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Chapter 1.1 Line, Shape, and the Principle of Contrast PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts , Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn Shields Lines to Regulate and Control Regular lines express control and planning
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Artwork: Mel Bochner, Vertigo 1.1.4 Mel Bochner, Vertigo , 1982. Charcoal, Conté crayon, and pastel on canvas, 9’ × 6’2”. Albright- Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York
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PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.1 Line, Shape, and the Principle of Contrast Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts , Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn Shields Mel Bochner, Vertigo Uses regular, ruled line drawn with a straightedge The repetition and overlapping impart a feeling of disarray
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Artwork: Barbara Hepworth, Drawing for Sculpture 1.1.5 Barbara Hepworth, Drawing for Sculpture (with color) , 1941. Pencil and gouache on paper mounted on board, 14 × 16”. Private collection
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PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.1 Line, Shape, and the Principle of Contrast Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts , Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn Shields Barbara Hepworth, Drawing for Sculpture Hepworth created four views of a planned sculpture The lines are crisp and clear She translates feelings and sensations into drawings and sculptures
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Chapter 1.1 Line, Shape, and the Principle of Contrast PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts , Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn Shields Lines to Express Freedom and Passion Lines can be irregular Such lines—free and unrestrained —seem passionate and full of feelings that are otherwise hard to express
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Artwork: André Masson, Automatic Drawing 1.1.6 André Masson, Automatic Drawing , 1925–26. Ink on paper, 12 × 9½”. Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France
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PART 1 FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1.1 Line, Shape, and the Principle of Contrast Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts , Second Edition, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, and M. Kathryn Shields André Masson, Automatic Drawing Wanted to express the depths of the subconscious Automatic drawings look spontaneous and free
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Artwork: Jean Dubuffet, Suite avec 7 Personnages 1.1.7 Jean Dubuffet, Suite avec 7 Personnages, 1981.
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