Falls under the equal pay act of 1963 employment

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falls under the Equal Pay Act of 1963 (Employment Discrimination, 2021). In Beth’s case, she is being discriminated against due to her gender, but in the United States, she is considered a protected class under the EEOC. She will be able to pursue a lawsuit on the grounds of discrimination. In addition to Title VII, the 1981 Act protects individuals against race-based discrimination. Specifically, this law protects against discrimination in hiring, retaliatory firing, and hostile work environments. This act would protect Elena and Viktor from retaliatory action
or termination after lodging formal complaints against NBD due to the disparity in pay (Employment Discrimination, 2021). The Age Discrimination in Employment Act, which addresses the protection of employees over the age of forty, will shield Beth and Michael. Finally, since NBD headquarters is located in Delaware, the state law which would apply is Del. Code Tit. 19 §710. Under this statute, it is illegal for an employer to discriminate based on race, marital status, genetic information, color, age, religion, gender (to include pregnancy), sexual orientation, gender identity, or national origin. Elena, Viktor, Michael, and Beth can file claims with the Delaware Department of Labor Division of Industrial Affairs Office of Anti- Discrimination (DDOL), or the federal administrative agency, as well as the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The events surrounding the case did not happen in the United States; instead, they occurred in Serafini, a foreign territory where NBD is located. If we are to apply U.S. and International Laws in Serafini, Elena and Viktor, despite being employed by a U.S. company, are not protected by U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity laws, as they are non-U.S. citizens operating outside of the United States. On the other hand, under Equal Employment Opportunity Law, Michael and Beth are protected against unfair treatment when working for a U.S. company outside of the United States. Section 109 of the Civil Rights Act of 1991 grants extraterritorial reach protections to U.S. citizens working overseas for U.S. employers. However, Beth’s work permit was denied by the Serafini’s Labor Office, which is a government institution. Even though they have denied her work permit without cause, we cannot prove any kind of discrimination, and consequently, Beth will not be able to work in Serafini. In reference to Michael’s situation, Serafini does have laws that prevent Michael from obtaining a work permit
due to his age. As a result, he will be unable to legally work in Serafini (Extraterritorial Reach of Laws, 2021). Recommendations and Conclusion Companies and professionals working worldwide may think that cultural differences are not significant, but they play an important part in the success of businesses and personal relationships. Culture impacts several aspects of business related to decision making, negotiations, protocols, and managing employees, just to name a few. One simple mistake could gravely affect business operations. Therefore, our team recommendation will be focused on our

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