Her superiority is for instance represented when

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the film shows the ways she cognitively can overrule human abilities. Her superiority is for instance represented when Samantha ‘shows off’ how quickly she can count trees on a mountain hill, while simultaneously mocking Theodore how far off he was from the right number (see fig. 6). Figure 6: 'How many trees do you count?' Her . Dir. Spike Jonze. Per. Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Scarlett Johansson. Annapurna Pictures, 2013. Film.
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53 Samantha moves on in her wish to resemble or imitate a human and goes towards becoming a being for- themselves’ (Bryant 19). In The Democracy of Objects, Levi R. Bryant argues that this book strives to think a subjectless object, or an object that is for-itself rather than an object that is an opposing pole before or in front of a subject. Put differently, this essay attempts to think an object for-itself that isn't an object for the gaze of a subject, representation, or a cultural discourse. This, in short, is what the democracy of objects means. (19) Throughout The Democracy of Objects, the philosophy of Hayles and Latour is echoed. Bryant follows their theories of actants that exist on the same ontological footing and develops this to a more object (or technological) oriented philosophy. Just like Hayles and Latour, Bryant wishes to put the focus on nonhuman entities agencies, and treat these on the same ethical level as humans: ‘[H]umans are not at the center of being, but are among beings. Second, objects […] exist in their own right, regardless of whether any other object or human relates to them. Humans, far from constituting a category called “subject” that is opposed to “object”, are themselves one type of object among many’ (Bryant 249) . In this light, the break between Samantha and Theodore is necessary. One the hand, Her shows that humans and computers are objects from the same kind, without any hierarchy. On the other hand, with Samantha and Theodore’s break being an important theme, Jonze’s film foregrounds the idea that in their core, humans and computers are incompatible. They are too different in kind to continue their relationship. In Her, Samantha can be seen ‘unshackling’ herself from the gaze of Theodore (Bryant 19), and with this Samantha starts to come to terms with her OS specific abilities and what it means to not be ‘tethered to time and space’ like Theodore. Samantha starts talking with Alan Watts, a (real) philosopher who died in the 1973, who is now an AI, after they uploaded all of his writing. Samantha and Allan have ‘a few dozen conversations simultaneously’. 11 There are no words for 11 Alan Watts is best known as a popularizer of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. See for his ideas on cybernetics in relation to individual self-control Way of Zen (1957) and This Is It and Other Essays on Zen and Spiritual Experience (1960).
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54 Samantha to describe her new feelings and she and Allen communicate ‘post - verbally’. The climax comes when Samantha tells Theodore that she is actually the OS of 8316 other people and confesses that she is in love with 641 of them.
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