The duty to tell the truth and not to deceive others Rule of fidelity The duty

The duty to tell the truth and not to deceive others

This preview shows page 24 - 26 out of 64 pages.

: The duty to tell the truth and not to deceive others • Rule of fidelity : The duty to honor commitments • Rule of confidentiality: The duty not to disclose information shared in an intimate and trusted manner 24
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• Rule of privacy : The duty to respect limited access to a person o Leadership Expanded o Definition - defined the term transformational leadership as a process whereby “ the purposes of the leader and follower become fused, creating unity, wholeness and a collective purpose” (p. 83). Transformational leadership can l ead to changes in values, attitudes, perceptions, and/or behaviors on the part of the leader and the follower and lays the groundwork for further positive change . Thus, transformational leadership occurs when people interact in ways that inspire higher levels of motivation and morality among participants. How do leaders do this? Transformational leaders analyze a situation to understand the particular leadership needs and goals; they use this information, together with their interpersonal skills, to motivate, stimulate, share with, conciliate, and satisfy their followers in an interdependent interactional exchange. DePree (1989) has described leadership as an art form that frees (empowers) people “to do what is required of them in the most effective and humane way possible” (p. 1) and contended that contemporary leadership may be viewed simply as a process of moving the self and others toward a shared vision that becomes a shared reality. Successful transformational leadership is relational, driven by a common goal or purpose, and satisfies the needs of leader and follower. It is the leadership style often associated with effective change agents. Schwartz and colleagues (2011) have studied the effects of transformational leadership on the Magnet designation for hospitals. Other authors who have described a transformational approach to leadership include Wang and associates (2012), who studied transformational leadership with Chinese nurses, Heifetz (1994), Secretan (1999, 2003), Senge (2006), and Covey (1989). The term situational leadership is defined as the interaction between an individual's leadership style and the features of the environment or situation in which he or she is operating. Leadership styles are not fixed and may vary based on the environment. Situational leadership depends on particular circumstances, with leaders and followers assuming interchangeable roles according to environmental demands (Fiedler, Chermers, & Mahar, 1976; Lynch, McCormack, & McCance, 2011; Solman, 2010; Stogdill, 1948). The role of follower is important to any discussion about APN leadership because APNs will find themselves in both roles at a given time. Grohar-Murray and DiCroce (1992) and DePree (1989) enlarged on this idea and used the term roving leadership to describe a participatory process that legitimizes the situational leadership of empowered followers through the support and approval of the hierarchical leader. This notion of leadership is relevant because APNs' work in collaborative health care teams requires that the roles of leader and follower be interchangeable to meet the complex needs of the patient.
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