Military combat men usually other precipitants

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Military combat (men, usually) Other precipitants: Accidental human calamities (motor vehicle accidents, plane crashes)  Floods, earthquakes, fires Deliberate human calamities (bombings, torture, death camps, being held hostage) Physical / emotional abuse (childhood sexual/physical abuse, partner abuse,  workplace abuse) Physical trauma (surgery, disease, disfigurement, head trauma) Infertility Stress Disorders (DSM-IV) Acute stress disorder  (Disability > 2 days and < 1 month) Post-traumatic stress disorder  (PTSD) (Disability >= 1 month) Acute Stress Disorder: U.S. Airways Flight 1549 (1/15/09) “I was terrified for my soul … you knew you were going to crash. I was two seconds from  drowning.  The first few nights in the hospital I had water dreams about drowning in  the galley of the plane… My insides have not stopped shaking.” Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder:  U.S. Airways Flight 1549 (1/15/09)
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“Each flight is getting more stressful,” said passenger Joe Hart, who flew over 11 times in  the months following the crash. “It starts with an adrenaline rush … your heart skips  a beat. Then you start thinking, ‘Was that a normal sound or was it another bird  going through the engine?’ I hope it will pass.” Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Point prevalence of 2-3 % in the general population, women > men. About 90% of PTSD sufferers had Acute Stress Disorder, only about 10% show just  “delayed stress.” Developed by 18% of combat veterans and 70% of P.O.W.’s. Typically lasts 1-2 years, but PTSD is  life-long  in 29% of combat veterans and 78% of  P.O.W.’s.  you're a POW for a long time, you are a captive. Things are done to you. What  is NOT true, someone has PTSD or an acute stress disorder, and they recall what happened  and they cry/get angry, and the feel all better and are cured Men and women show similar sign/symptom patterns in PTSD, except that: women are likelier to show numbing and anxious avoidance. men are likelier to show irritability and ETOH abuse. Risk Factors for Stress Disorders Family history of depression, anxiety disorders, or PTSD – perhaps these reflect  common inheritance Depression or anxiety disorder at the time of the trauma Early (prenatal?) traumatic conditioning ( Meaney Effect ) Severity and chronicity of trauma Poor social support
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Medication Treatment of Acute and  Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders  (no magic bullet yet to prevent the occurrence of  an acute or PTSD) (symptomatic treatment – which means what is bothering the patient?) Anxiolytics for anxiety, panic attacks – 
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