66 of 106 microbiology checklist 07282015 evidence of

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66 of 106 Microbiology Checklist 07.28.2015 Evidence of Compliance: Written procedures for stool for O&P AND Patient reports/worksheets with concentration and permanent stain results REFERENCES 1) Garcia LS, Diagnostic medical parasitology, 4th edition. Washington, DC: ASM Press, 2001 2) Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Procedures for the Recovery and Identification of Parasites From the Intestinal Tract; Approved Guideline—Second Edition. CLSI document M28-A2 (ISBN 1-56238-572-0). Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, 940 West Valley Road, Suite 1400, Wayne, Pennsylvania 19087-1898 USA, 2005 3) Pritt BS. Parasitology Benchtop Reference Guide: An Illustrated Guide for Commonly Encountered Parasites. Northfield, IL: College of American Pathologists; 2014. MIC.52190 Stool Number/Timing Phase I The laboratory has policies (developed with clinicians) for the number and/or timing of collection of stool specimens submitted for routine parasitology testing. NOTE: Suggestions made by the authors of a 1996 CAP Q-Probes study (Valenstein et al) include: 1. Accept no more than two or three specimens/patients without prior consultation with an individual who can explain the limited yield provided by additional specimens 2. Do not accept specimens from inpatients after the fourth hospital day, without prior consultation These recommendations are for diagnostic testing. Different policies may apply to tests ordered for follow-up. REFERENCES 1) Yannelli B, et al. Yield of stool cultures, ova and parasite tests, and Clostridium difficile determinations in nosocomial diarrhea. Am J Infect Control. 1988;16:246-249 2) Morris AJ, et al. Application of rejection criteria for stool ovum and parasite examinations. J Clin Microbiol. 1992;30:3213-3216 3) Valenstein P, et al. The use and abuse of routine stool microbiology. A College of American Pathologists Q-probes study of 601 institutions. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 1996;120:206-211 4) Cartwright CP. Utility of multiple-stool-specimen ova and parasite examinations in high-prevalence setting. J Clin Microbiol. 1999;37:2408-2411 BLOOD FILMS FOR MALARIA AND OTHER PARASITES MIC.52193 Blood Parasite Detection Phase II The microscopic examination of blood films submitted for detection of blood parasites allows for detection of parasites responsible for malaria, babesiosis, trypanosomiasis and filariasis. REFERENCES 1) NCCLS. Laboratory Diagnosis of Blood-Borne Parasitic Diseases; Approved Guideline. NCCLS Document M15-A . (ISBN 1-56238-401-5). NCCLS, 940 West Valley Road, Suite 1400, Wayne, PA 19087-1898 USA, 2000. 2) Pritt BS. Parasitology Benchtop Reference Guide: An Illustrated Guide for Commonly Encountered Parasites. Northfield, IL: College of American Pathologists; 2014. MIC.52195 Percentage Parasitemia Reporting Phase I When blood films are positive for malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), the percentage parasitemia is reported along with the organism identification.

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