Adobe Premiere Pro has a huge advantage over Final Cut Pro when it comes to

Adobe premiere pro has a huge advantage over final

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Adobe Premiere Pro has a huge advantage over Final Cut Pro when it comes to footage that was captured on-the-fly in the Capture panel. Adobe Premiere Pro can name these clips after they’ve been captured. In Final Cut Pro, renaming clips requires forcing the media file to match the new name. Importing footage from tapeless (file-based) cameras In Adobe Premiere Pro, you can import and edit clips from nearly any file-based media directly including P2, AVCHD, XDCAM, AVCCAM, DPX, and AVC-Intra as well as DSLR and RED cameras without transcoding or rewrapping. You can begin viewing and editing straight from the cards, but it is more efficient to copy their contents to a hard disk before importing. This also improves playback performance, and, the importing of clips doesn’t actually move or copy them. If the files aren’t moved from the card or optical media to a hard drive, they will go offline if the card or optical media are removed from the system. Locate and open footage easily with the Media Browser panel, which lets you drag and drop files to the Project panel, preview them in the Source Monitor, or add them to a sequence in the Timeline. Notice how P2 clips can be viewed as video clips or as a group of file folders.
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7 Editing with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 if you’re a Final Cut Pro user There are three main ways to import files into Adobe Premiere Pro. Two of the methods—using the File > Import command and drag and drop from the Finder—are identical to those in Final Cut Pro. The others method is via the Media Browser panel which is the most effective way to find tapeless media in Adobe Premiere Pro because it can actually see the camera clips without having to import them into your system. The Media Browser is part of the editing interface and allows you to see all the media on the drives and cards connected to your computer. To import media from these cameras: 1. Choose Window > Media Browser or press Shift+8. 2. Select the type of media you want to see in the View pull-down menu. The media browser will see and play the media files themselves instead of wading through a convoluted file and directory structure. For details on how to work with a specific camera and its format, check out the video production workflow guides available online: Using Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 with Canon Digital Video Cameras Using Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 with tapeless Sony XDCAM content Using Adobe Premiere Pro CS5 with RED Digital Cinema content CS5 Production Premium end-to-end editing workflows with Panasonic AVCCAM cameras CS5 Production Premium end-to-end workflows for Panasonic P2 and P2HD cameras Importing from Adobe OnLocation CS5 Another powerful way to ingest media is to use Adobe OnLocation CS5 software (included with Adobe Premiere Pro CS5, as well as with Adobe Creative Suite 5 Production Premium and Master Collection). Adobe OnLocation allows you to live capture DV, HDV, or DVCPRO footage directly from the camera to your computer hard drive through Firewire. It also allows you to get all the benefits of real-time, on-set logging when working with tapeless cameras too.
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