Fast as she can she hurries something ominous her

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Fast as she can she hurries, something ominous, her steps trembling,She does not tarry to smooth her hair nor adjust her cap.Open the envelope quickly,O this is not our son’s writing, yet his name is sign’d,O a strange hand writes for our dear son, O strickenmother’s soul!All swims before her eyes, flashes with black, she catches themain words only,Sentences broken, gunshot wound in the breast, cavalryskirmish, taken to hospital,At present low, but will soon be better.Ah now the single figure to me,Amid all teeming and wealthy Ohio with all its cities and
6farms,Sickly white in the face and dull in the head, very faint,By the jamb of a door leans.Grieve not so, dear mother, (the just-grown daughter speaksthrough her sobs,The little sisters huddle around speechless and dismay’d,)See, dearest mother, the letter says Pete will soon be better.Alas poor boy, he will never be better, (nor maybe needs to bebetter, that brave and simple soul,)While they stand at home at the door he is dead already,The only son is dead.But the mother needs to be better,She with thin form presently drest in black,By day her meals untouch’d, then at night fitfully sleeping,often waking,In the midnight waking, weeping, longing with one deeplonging,O that she might withdraw unnoticed, silent from life escapeand withdraw, To follow, to seek, to be with her dear dead son.
7Read the poem that celebrates mountain climbing.To the MountainsLet there be light, the skyDeclares. And the sun answers.Yellow ribbons cascade acrossA serrated skyline, filling each valleyUntil it bursts.Alpine mornings wake in defianceOf gravity. The rock opens its hands,Draws men up, through the light.Distant summits, where the earthMeets the heavens.The earth shifts through each ribbon,Like water, an ocean of rockBraced against, all that space.Where men drift, a sea above and below,And reach.
8Read the speech.excerpt from Thomas Jefferson’s First Inaugural AddressThomas Jefferson delivered this speech on March 4, 1801. At that time, the two major political parties in the United States were the Federalists and the Republicans.But every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists. If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it. I know, indeed, that some honest men fear that a republicangovernment can not be strong, that this Government is not strong enough; but would the honest patriot, in the full tide of successful experiment, abandon a government which has so far kept us free and firm on the theoretic and visionary fear that this Government, the world’s best hope, may by possibility want energy to preserve itself? I trust not. I believe this, on the contrary, the strongest Government on earth. I believe it the only one where every man, at the call of the law,

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