Why would wealth make you more likely to grab a place in a lifeboat and escape

Why would wealth make you more likely to grab a place

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Why would wealth make you more likely to grab a place in a lifeboat and escape from a sinking ship? On the Titanic (as on most cruise ships), people who paid more money for their fares had better rooms. The wealthiest and most socially important passengers had rooms with windows located on the upper deck, near the lifeboats. The second-class passengers were on the same deck, but farther away from the lifeboats. The steerage, or third-class passengers, stayed below decks, and they had no easy access to the lifeboats. Once it was clear that the Titanic was going to sink, everyone tried to get to a lifeboat. But the rule for getting on a boat was "women and children and first-class men first." Many women chose to stay behind if their husbands, in third class, did not get a place on the boat. Many second-class men tried to get seats, but were not allowed on until all first-class passengers had
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boarded. Hundreds of people died when the Titanic sank; most of those people had come aboard as third-class passengers. The story of who died and who survived the sinking of the Titanic illustrates the concept called social stratification. Social stratification is a system that ensures some people get more things and better resources than others. Sometimes social stratification is very formal and rigid, as it was aboard the Titanic. Sometimes it's not as obvious. But in every part of the world, social stratification is a part of life. Most of the time, being a member of a lower class is not a death sentence. But sometimes it can be. Types of Social Stratification: Caste and Class Caste systems are probably the most obvious form of social stratification. Your caste defines where you fall in the social hierarchy. There are upper caste and lower caste people in every society. In some societies, though, castes are much easier to see and understand then they are in others. In India, for example, people are born into castes with specific names and qualities. The Brahmins are the top caste, and they are entitled to land, resources, servants, and lovely homes. The Untouchables are the bottom caste. Their job is to do the worst tasks of society, such as cleaning dead bodies. Although many Brahmins are wealthy, the Untouchables live in desperate poverty. In general, members of the different castes do not intermarry. Although the caste system is the most obvious form of social stratification, other parts of the world have very strong, clear social strata . Strata are layers of sedimentary rock or soil with internally consistent characteristics that distinguish them from other layers. Social strata, therefore, refers to different layers of society (upper class, middle class, lower class, etc.) In Britain and other European countries, for example, some people are nobles , and others are commoners . Nobles have titles, such as Duke, Earl, Count, and Baron. Until recently, being noble meant a person had money, leisure, a fabulous home, and plenty of servants. Being a commoner meant having far less of everything - and it often meant actually becoming a servant to the wealthy. Many commoners were excited when
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