Employed less experienced teachers in Angle Saxon schools Taught to do labor

Employed less experienced teachers in angle saxon

This preview shows page 1 out of 1 page.

- Employed less experienced teachers in Angle Saxon schools - Taught to do labor work, focusing on agricultural needs - Mexicans immigrants made up 45% immigrants from southern and eastern Europe - Saw Mexicans were seeking to take land back from Americans. - Mexican families were much bigger than American families (8 or 9 children) - Repatriation is the return of someone to their own native country - 60% of the 1.8 million people deported to Mexico were legal American citizens The Great Migration - Prior to 1910, approximately 90% of African Americans lived in the south. Most worked in agriculture, typically as sharecroppers / tenant farmers. As Takaki points out, this meant that African Americans were legally free but in “economic bondage” because many families were in debt. - Because of increases in Nativism that led to immigration constraints, there were labor shortages in the North. Thus, factory owners recruited African American workers in the South. This increased with the entrance of the U.S to World War I in 1917 - Thus, one of the primary motivators for the Great Migration was financial. This was also true for Mexicans who sought El Norte. - The other significant force behind the Great Migration were shifting mentalities of African-Americans. As older A.A who were former slaves gave way to a younger generation born free, ingrained ideas of subservience and subordination also began to lose their power
Image of page 1

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read the whole page?

  • Fall '12
  • Butterfeild
  • Southern United States, Human migration, Sikh

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture