Inaya begin to give details about the movie and had to be redirected I also

Inaya begin to give details about the movie and had

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her to see a movie. Inaya begin to give details about the movie and had to be redirected. I also noticed that she struggled to use words in past tense. She stated that one of her group members “goed” to Hawaii, versus using the word “went”. The student being referenced took a trip to Ohio to visit family. The highlight of this assessment was Inaya’s ability to explain the difference between a “pin” and a “pen” for a teammate. A student built the word “pin” but did not understand the difference between a push pin and a writing pen. Inaya located the correct picture for the word “pin” and explained to her teammate that the words sound the same but are spelled differently. She even explained that pins are used to hang pictures and pointed to our student work samples that were hung by pins. Moving forward, Inaya I will work to improve Inaya’s syntax to ensure that she uses appropriate tenses for past tense and plural words.
5 The last assessment given to Inaya was a phonics assessment. This is a self-created assessment, I use to assess student’s knowledge of word families, blending and segmenting. Decoding is a vital skill for good readers to have. It is important for young learners to correctly pronounce familiar and unfamiliar words automatically; so, they can devote full attention to the task of comprehending the text (Wren, Litke, Jinkins, Paynter, Watts, & Alanis ,2013). The assessment began with me verbally asking Inaya to write the word I say. I used a combination of CVC words and sight words for this portion. When prompted to write the word car, Inaya wrote “cra”. She can hear the correct sounds; however, she did not list the phonemes in the correct order. She did not make this mistake when spelling dog or sun. I believe this was a simple mistake and is not an area for concern. The second half of the assessment required the student to circle the word spelled correctly. I orally stated the word, and the student found the word in print. Inaya answered all the questions on this portion of the assessment correctly. Lastly, I asked the student to write the sentence “I like candy”. I chose this sentence because it contained two sight words the young learner should be familiar with at this point of the school year. Candy is a great word for students to spell phonetically. It also includes the “an” sound we frequently worked on. Inaya spelled candy, the way I anticipated “cande”. I knew she would end the word with the letter e versus the letter “Y”. Inaya used a capital d versus a lowercase. This is common in Kindergarten; however, I did remind Inaya that capital letters are used only in the beginning of sentences unless it is a name.

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