These are the inflammatory muscle diseases in which

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these are the inflammatory muscle diseases in which the body’s own immune system inappropriately injures its muscles. A related immune mediated disease is myasthenia gravis. Other non-genetic muscle diseases may be due to drugs or hormonal disorders. The Inflammatory Muscle Diseases When the patient’s immune system damages the body’s own muscle tissues, the result is an inflammatory muscle disease. Three main types of inflammatory muscle diseases are identified: Polymyositis - A rare inflammatory disease that causes muscle weakness on both sides of the body. People around the age of 30 to 50 years are the demographic that develop the disease, with dark- skinned women primarily being affected. The condition can make it difficult to get up from a seated posture, climb stairs, or even reach overhead and life objects. Dermatomyositis- Dermatomyositis is an inflammatory disease characterized by muscle weakness and a distinctive rash. The condition can occur in both children and adults, affecting mostly females. Skin changes are often described as appearing violet-colored or dusky red, most commonly on the face, eyelids, knuckles, elbows, knees, chest, and back. Rashes are often painful and itchy and are the first sign of dermatomyositis. Muscle weakness of the hips, thighs, shoulders, upper arms, and neck are commonly observed. Weakness can affect both sides of the body and become progressively worse. Inclusion body myositis. These diseases usually affect adults, although dermatomyositis may also affect children. Patients with these diseases develop progressive weakness of the hip and shoulder muscles over a few weeks or months, sometimes with difficulty in swallowing. In the case of dermatomyositis, a characteristic rash may occur. It is very important to correctly diagnose these disorders because
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  • Fall '17
  • MarciaGuilliams
  • muscle weakness, Muscular dystrophy, Neuromuscular disease

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