He sees a dead man which for a roman centurion in

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Introductory Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 01
Introductory Psychology
Rathus
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He sees a dead man which for a Roman centurion in that part of the world would not be especially unusual. The author includes several elements and presents them as part of the same scene: 95
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Introductory Psychology
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 01
Introductory Psychology
Rathus
Expert Verified
NTNotesImperato 33 And when the sixth hour had come, there was darkness over the whole land until the ninth hour. 34 And at the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, “E′lo-i, E′lo-i, la′ma sabach-tha ′ni?” which means, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” 35 And some of the bystanders hearing it said, “Behold, he is calling Eli′jah.” 36 And one ran and, filling a sponge full of vinegar, put it on a reed and gave it to him to drink, saying, “Wait, let us see whether Eli′jah will come to take him down.” 37 And Jesus uttered a loud cry, and breathed his last. 38 And the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. 39 And when the centurion, who stood facing him, saw that he thus breathed his last, he said, “Truly this man was the Son of God!” Though part of the same scene, the centurion could not be observing Jesus dying on the cross and the temple veil tearing simultaneously. Check ancient maps: various estimates have Golgotha between 600 yards and about a mile and a half away from the Temple. More significantly veil was behind walls! [ 96
NTNotesImperato ] The author operates as though he has three cameras: one on Jesus, one on the Temple and one on the centurion. They are combined into one scene not to depict what one would see if one were there but rather the significance of the scene. 97
NTNotesImperato Mark is saying to the reader: “If you want to understand Jesus, you need to understand him in terms of the cross” and “furthermore the Jewish Temple no longer matters.” Consider the rhetorical function of the death of Jesus in this Gospel. “The Gospel writers, or the oral traditions they incorporate, augmented the rhetorical impact of Jesus’ death by narrativizing it and thus further shaping the early Christian discourse of sacrifice.” (Heyman, George. The Power of Sacrifice : Roman and Christian Discourses in Conflict . Catholic University of America Press, 2007, p.122). As Jesus lived and died so too his followers . . . [MESSIAH from Encyclopaedia Judaica | 2007 | Ginsberg, Harold; Flusser, David; Blidstein, Gerald; Dan, Joseph; Jacobs, Louis MESSIAH , an anglicization of the Latin Messias , which is borrowed from the Greek Μεσσιας, an adaptation of the Aramaic meshi a (Aram. אח ישמ ), a translation of the Hebrew ( ha-melekh ) ha- mashi'a (Heb. ך ל מל ה ] מ חישמח ה ]), " the Anointed [King]"; a charismatically endowed descendant of David who the Jews of the Roman period believed would be raised up by God to break the yoke of the heathen and to reign over a restored kingdom of Israel to which all the Jews of the Exile would return. This is a strictly postbiblical concept. Even *Haggai and *Zechariah , who expected the

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