Theyre episodes still its good to observe these sorts

This preview shows page 17 - 19 out of 25 pages.

these sorts of thematic connections.Let’s take a break from the score and return to the video-recorded performance by the Lyon Quartet to listen again to the second movement.  See if you can follow the broad formal outline of this Rondo form: A B A C A.  As we’ll hear in this movement, not all refrains are necessarily complete.  Notice, too, that there is a Coda tacked on to the end of the movement, following the third refrain, that includes more than a passing reference to the principal motive of the refrain.Third Movement: Minuet and TrioIn a Classical four-movement pattern, the third movement is customarily a “Minuet and Trio,” which is really to say that it’s “Minuet I and Minuet II.”  (“Trio” initially referred to a change in instrumentation and texture in Minuet II . . . it’s a long story.)Minuets in the Classical style are customarily rounded binary formsand that’s the case here. The performance practice for a Minuet and Triomovement is to play the Minuet (Minuet I), taking the written repeats; followed by the Trio (Minuet II), taking the written repeats; and then to return to the Minuet (Minuet I) and play it once again, but without taking the repeats.So, at a higher structural level, a Minuet and Trio movement can be represented formally in this way:A                      B                      AMinuet            Trio                 Minuet           
We can see that this is a large-scale Ternary form.  And because the overall form literally strings together the smaller forms, “Minuet and Trio and Minuet,” we refer to this as a “Composite Ternary form.”We’ll examine the Minuet and Trio with the scores in Discussion Board #3.  For now, listen for the change of key between the two.  The Minuet is in the key of G major (the tonic key), while the Trio is in the key of D major (the dominant key).Once again, let’s return to the video-recorded performance by the Lyon Quartet to listen again to the third movement.  See if you can hear the individual rounded binary forms of the Minuet and Trio, while also following the broad formal outline of Composite Ternary form (A B A).Fourth Movement: RondoThe final movement of four-movement genres is sometimes a sonata-allegro form.  More often, though, it’s a rondo, as is this one.  Rondo form is less “formal.”  (Pardon the pun.)  It’s more relaxed than a sonata-allegro form, and in a major-key piece it can be rollicking fun!

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture