which there will be enough flammable vapor to induce ignition when an ignition

Which there will be enough flammable vapor to induce

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which there will be enough flammable vapor to induce ignition when an ignition source is applied [3] Flaming cocktails with a flash point lower than room temperature. Contents Liquids Mechanism
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Fuel Flash point Autoignition temperature Ethanol (70%) 16.6 °C (61.9 °F) [6] 363 °C (685 °F) [6] Gasoline (petrol) −43 °C (−45 °F) [7] 280 °C (536 °F) [8] Diesel (2-D) >52 °C (126 °F) [7] 256 °C (493 °F) [8] Jet fuel (A/A-1) >38 °C (100 °F) 210 °C (410 °F) Kerosene >38–72 °C (100–162 °F) 220 °C (428 °F) Vegetable oil (canola) 327 °C (621 °F) 424 °C (795 °F) [9] Biodiesel >130 °C (266 °F) There are two basic types of flash point measurement: open cup and closed cup . [4] In open cup devices, the sample is contained in an open cup which is heated and, at intervals, a flame brought over the surface. The measured flash point will actually vary with the height of the flame above the liquid surface and, at sufficient height, the measured flash point temperature will coincide with the fire point. The best-known example is the Cleveland open cup (COC). [5] There are two types of closed cup testers: non-equilibrial, such as Pensky-Martens, where the vapours above the liquid are not in temperature equilibrium with the liquid, and equilibrial, such as Small Scale (commonly known as Setaflash), where the vapours are deemed to be in temperature equilibrium with the liquid. In both these types, the cups are sealed with a lid through which the ignition source can be introduced. Closed cup testers normally give lower values for the flash point than open cup (typically 5–10 °C or 9– 18 °F lower) and are a better approximation to the temperature at which the vapour pressure reaches the lower flammable limit. The flash point is an empirical measurement rather than a fundamental physical parameter. The measured value will vary with equipment and test protocol variations, including temperature ramp rate (in automated testers), time allowed for the sample to equilibrate, sample volume and whether the sample is stirred.
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