Representatives of nearly all the interested agencies attended the March 14

Representatives of nearly all the interested agencies

This preview shows page 256 - 258 out of 408 pages.

hoped to learn what it was going to take to win Treasury over. Representatives of nearly all the interested agencies attended the March 14 meeting at the Treasury Department. O'Reilly, the physically imposing exfootball player, sat across a large table from McNamar, a welterweight jogger. McNamar convened the gathering by paying tribute to Copaken's Herculean efforts and the vast amount of information that Houdaille had provided the government. He then said what Copaken and O'Reilly came to hear. Treasury was willing to make a positive recommendation to the president, especially since Houdaille's proposed tax remedy was now a dead letter. But McNamar still had serious doubts and questions. He needed more facts. To at least one observer,
Image of page 256
McNamar sounded like Sgt. Joe Friday from the old television series "Dragnet." 114 As McNamar peppered him with questions, O'Reilly vented all the tension that had been building up inside him for months. The one bureaucracy that had done more in the past eleven months to deny Houdaille its just relief was now asking for more facts. How can one company be expected to take on an entire foreign industry and government? O'Reilly asked, his voice sputtering. McNamar responded by upbraiding O'Reilly. Japan's penetration of the U.S. market was not de facto proof of a government-subsidized cartel, no matter how many times Houdaille repeated that allegation. The meeting abruptly ended in a shouting match. 115 Copaken was nearly in a panic. He had hoped to switch Treasury's allegiance at almost the last moment, before the remaining White Hats, Carl Green, and Stanton Anderson knew what hit them and had time to recover. He brought O'Reilly along because he had always proven persuasive in the past, and meeting with top officials helped keep his frustration in check. What was intended as a shrewd initiative now looked like a terrible mistake, made at the worst possible time. Copaken's fear was premature. After a day or two, McNamar's anger receded, and he wrote O'Reilly a letter. He reiterated his willingness to back Houdaille if certain lingering questions could be answered to his satisfaction. O'Reilly blanched at the thought of what it was going to cost. But he passed the letter on to his counsel, and Copaken, with his leave-no-stone-unturned approach, promptly accepted the challenge. He wrote McNamar, and promised to be as "responsive as humanly possible" to his questions. 116 Winning McNamar's allegiance was going to be pivotal, because the White Hats, including Treasury, simultaneously decided to launch an all-out attack on the Houdaille petition. On March 23, they submitted a so-called White Hats Paper intended to finish the Houdaille case once and for all. It challenged every premise and conclusion in the petition, including points of *act that the Jap- bashers insisted were no longer in dispute. The White Hats maintained that Japan had not violated GATT, MITI's targeting amounted to nothing more than exhortations, a cartel never existed, and government subsidies were insignificant.
Image of page 257
Image of page 258

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 408 pages?

  • Fall '19
  • Ms. Rowena

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture