Bach graduated in 1703 and over the next several years he took positions at

Bach graduated in 1703 and over the next several

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Bach graduated in 1703, and over the next several years he took positions at several churches. In 1708, he became the court organist in Weimer and later the courtmaster for DukeWilheim. In these positions for the ruling elite, Bach had the opportunity to compose many works, which helped him hone his style and technique. In 1723, he took a position as organist and teacher at St. Thomas Church. There, he composed mostly religious works, including a few masses, even though Bach himself was Lutheran.By 1749, Bach began to experience failing eyesight. A renowned British eye surgeon performed corrective surgery on the composer, but the results were not as hoped for as he was completely blind after the surgery. He died in 1750 at the age of sixty-five from what may have been a stroke complicated by pneumonia.Bach's work can be separated into three different stages. His early work (from about 1708 to 1717) includes most of Bach's organ music. His middle work (from about 1718 to 1723) includes many of Bach's instrumental works. His late work (from 1724 to 1750) includes most
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of his sacred choral music. Throughout his life, Bach composed music that was almost mathematically precise. In other words, Bach's works have a technical mastery that many other composers could only hope for.Many scholars have argued that Bach's "Air" from the Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D Major is oneof the pieces that best exemplifies his work. This piece of music has remained popular and it is likely that at least some of you will recognize the music. It showcases both Bach's technical precision and the beautiful melodies that he created in his work.Another characteristic of Bach's compositions is that he tended to write out the details of the melodic notation. Some composers during the Baroque period would write down the basic notations on the melody, giving musicians and singers the ability to add embellishments of their own to the music. Bach, however, tended to write out most of the notations in his scores. Some scholars have suggested that this gave Bach greater control over the complex textures and embellishments that he added to his music. Yet, Bach also tended to leave some of the instrumental notations more basic in his work, particularly some of the longer pieces.Johann Sebastian Bach once said of Georg Friedrich Handel, "He is the only person I would wish to see before I die, and the only person I would wish to be, were I not Bach".German born, Handel is widely regarded as one of the Baroque period's best composers, and it is clear that his contemporaries thought so as well. His works include some of the best-known works of classical music, including Messiah, Water Music, and Music for the Royal Fireworks.Born in 1685 (the same year as Bach), Handel did not expect to become a musician or composer. In fact, he began studying law, which was his father's profession. His musical interests had been noted, however, from a young age. His father forbade Handel to learn a musical instrument, but Handel snuck a small harpsichord up to his room to practice on. After his father died in 1703, Handel abandoned his study of law in favor of music. In 1704, he
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