One conspicuous example of how businesses established

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One conspicuous example of how businesses established by Chinese returnees cradle social problems is that they have turned the internet into a convenient portal for piracy. Although the Chinese legal system and culture have always shown a casual disregard for the protection of intellectual property, Baidu and its founder Robin Li chose to facilitate the problem by landing links to one-stop MP3 downloads of virtually all Chinese popular music files and storing 2.8 million books in its Baidu Library for free digital downloading without the authors’ permission of any kind. What’s more, when several Chinese writers attempted to negotiate with Baidu, Li, who is believed to have leant about what it means to protect copyright in the United States, sent a management team to deny Baidu’s infringement on intellectual property, saying that Baidu is just a platform that allows netizens to share their readings. Ironically, it is Han Han, China’s most famous blogger who can’t even speak English properly, that pointed out Li’s problem and showed him what should be done by China’s richest entrepreneur. In Han Han’s blog post “A Letter to Mr. Robin Li,” he writes in Chinese, “Mr. Li, given your education and life experience in the America, you should know what would be the consequences if you started a similar ‘sharing platform’ there... but you would never do so because you know whom can be bullied and whom can’t... Baidu Library could very well become the basis for the wealth of Chinese authors, and not the grave in which they are buried…You are now the country’s number one entrepreneur. As a role model for others, the time has come to make your position known on the damage done to the publishing industry by Baidu Library…” (Epstein). Han Han’s sharp pen
Di 8represented the voices of thousands of poor authors in China who make a humble living within a system where intellectual property laws are dishearteningly lax, calling upon these Chinese returnees to bring in not only knowledge, but also a noble respect for knowledge. Similarly, Alibaba also chose to foster rampant piracy under its wings while its management team turned their heads away from counterfeit goods trades on the website. In a Forbes article “Alibaba’s Thieves Threaten Yahoo,” Zachary M. Seward warns that the cooperation between Alibaba and Yahoo could “expose the company [Yahoo] under U.S. counterfeit laws” (Seward). The same article reports that, a report by the International AntiCounterfeiting Coalition even concluded that “counterfeiters from all over the world converge on the Alibaba.com site.” (Seward). On Feb. 22, 2011, it was revealed that there had been fraudulent transactions by 1,219 of the “gold suppliers” registered in 2009 and 1,107 of those in 2010, and 100 Alibaba sales people intentionally let theses fraudulent transactions evade regular verification measures, the Time magazine reported (Ramzy). It was not until then that the managing team took serious action to restore trust, dismissing over 100 employees and having its CEO David Wei and COO Elvis Lee resign from their positions. Though piracy has been a long-

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