notes_MGMT101_summary of the book

Again long and committed employees experts slowsteady

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ladder. Again, long and committed employees (experts, slow/steady climb to top) e.iv. Fortress culture – surviving and reversing sagging fortunes. Confident individuals who enjoy excitement, challenge, and opp for turnarounds
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f. Competing values framework – based on focus and control f.i. Focus – either internally focused or externally f.ii. Control – flexible or fixed in how it control activity f.iii. Bureaucracy – fixed,internal. Stability and hierarchical control f.iv. Empowered – flexible, internal. High morale and cohesiveness. Support f.v. Entrepreneurial – external, flexible. Growth through adaptability f.vi. Goal oriented – external, fixed. Productivity and competing in the marketplace through careful planning. g. Two forces for homogeneity – g.i. Bottom up (Schneider, the ASA model)– people make the place g.i.1. Attraction – people are attracted to organizations they fit in g.i.2. Selection – org select people w attributes they desire g.i.3. Attrition – any errors in attraction-selection process will be corrected w attrition (hiring and firing) g.i.4. The ASA starts w the founder and key people g.ii. Top down – people take on the organizational culture when joining g.ii.1. Socialization – formal (training) and informal (social interactions) – using the steps for socialization above h. Control systems h.i. Output control – financial/operational performance h.ii. Behavior control – direction supervision, mgmt by rules h.iii. Organizational cultural controls – values, norms, socialization i. Power of socialization i.i. Zimbardo prison experiment –roles i.ii. Milgrim shock experiment – obedience j. Types of fit j.i. Person –org – fitting values beliefs/attitudes j.i.1. Benefits – boundaries, stability etc j.i.2. Harms – barriers to change/diversity j.ii. Person-job fit – KSAs k. How to change culture – leaders and key positions, performance evaluations (based on behavior that is consistent w values), destroy myths, 11. Lecture 10: Groups and teams a. Group – collection of people with shared norms, goals, and have a common identity b. Team – small group of people w complementary skills, who are committed to a common purpose and are mutually accountable c. Formal – formed to be productive and achieve a goal, usually an appointed leader d. Informal – friendship, no appointed leader e. Types of teams (chart P468) AND e.i. Advice teams – broaden info for managerial decisions (panels, committees, etc) e.ii. Production teams – day-to-day operations (mining, flight crews) e.iii. Project teams – problem solving (task forces) e.iv. Action teams – accomplish tasks that require people w specialized training and high degree of coordination (baseball team, police SWAT)
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f. Self-managed teams – small groups of people who are given administrative oversight over their works (usually emerging from quality circles) f.i. Organizational redesigning must be done as well as re-aligning incentives g. How teams form (tuckman) g.i. Forming – getting oriented and acquainted. Trust is low, people try to break the ice, leaders should allow time to become acquainted g.ii. Storming – individual personalities and conflicts arise. Subgroups form,
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