To mean that christs enemies will be saved that when

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to mean that Christs’ enemies will be saved, that when evil is defeated salvation will come to all. Origen understands salvation in the way of proximity to God. Those that are closer to God are first in line to be saved and those that are further away from God take longer to reach the God. Simply put, the further you are from God while living will determine what you pass through to get to God in the end. A person who does not know God at all will have to pass through hell, and eventually make their way to God as they become aware of His truth.Origen argues that there is one good starter of the universe, one source of good, God. This good source can only have a good ending. Therefore, all humans get a
chance for their sins to be remediated by going through the purification process of hell. This is Origen’s attempt to explain the “striving” in Luke 13:23. The passing through of hell, and the knowledge that will be brought to you once you are going through this purification process is the outworking of God’s goodness and mercy and restoring the sinner back to himself.C.S. LewisFrom atheist, to pantheist, to theist to Christianity. That would be C.S. Lewis’s chronology of his introduction to Christ. He is regarded as one of the great minds of Christianity today. With the exception of a few controversial ideas, he is a reliable source of Christian thought. In Reflections on the Psalms, Lewis writes, "We are saved by grace…In our fleshdwells no good thing."[CSL58]. This idea and Luke 13:24 coincides with what Christ was communicating. That we do not have the strength it takes of our own to enter into the presence of God. That we need grace and faith that work together to accomplish salvation. Lewis writes that our flesh contains no good thing, this align with the writings and ideas of St. Augustine as well. Lewis emphatically believes that salvation is a gift that cannot be earned by works of the flesh. He believes that the only works that can count as effort is that of faith. It is salvation of the gift of grace by God through faith of men. In his book, English Literature in the Sixteenth Century Excluding Drama, Lewis writes “On the Protestant view one could not, and by God’s mercy, expiate one’s sins. Like an accepted lover, he feels that he has done nothing, and never could have done anything to deserve such astonishing happiness. All the initiative has been on God’s side, all has

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