To make it easier on their heirs some clients are putting provisions into their

To make it easier on their heirs some clients are

  • Notes
  • sendemailtoknow
  • 29
  • 100% (7) 7 out of 7 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 13 - 15 out of 29 pages.

To make it easier on their heirs, some clients are putting provisions into their healthcare proxies allowing whoever makes  end-of-life medical decisions to consider changes in estate-tax law. “We have done this at least a dozen times, and have 
Image of page 13
gotten more calls recently,” says Andrew Katzenstein, a lawyer with Proskauer Rose LLP in Los Angeles. Of course, plenty of taxpayers themselves are eager to live to see the new year. One wealthy, terminally ill real-estate  entrepreneur has told his doctors he is determined to live until the law changes. “Whenever he wakes up,” says his lawyer, “He says: ‘What day is it? Is it Jan. 1 yet?’”… The situation is causing at least one person to add the prospect of euthanasia to his estate-planning mix, according to Mr.  Katzenstein of Proskauer Rose. An elderly, infirm client of his recently asked whether undergoing euthanasia during 2010  in Holland, where it's legal, might allow his estate to dodge the tax. His answer: Yes. Source:   Wall Street Journal , December 30, 2009. 12-2b Administrative Burden If you ask the typical person on April 15 for an opinion about the tax system, you  might get an earful (perhaps peppered with expletives) about the headache of filling  out tax forms. The administrative burden of any tax system is part of the inefficiency it  creates. This burden includes not only the time spent in early April filling out forms  but also the time spent throughout the year keeping records for tax purposes and the  resources the government has to use to enforce the tax laws. Many taxpayers—especially those in higher tax brackets—hire tax lawyers and  accountants to help them with their taxes. These experts in the complex tax laws fill  out the tax forms for their clients and help them arrange their affairs in a way that  reduces the amount of taxes owed. This behavior is legal tax avoidance, which is  different from illegal tax evasion. Critics of our tax system say that these advisers help their clients avoid taxes by  abusing some of the detailed provisions of the tax code, often dubbed “loopholes.” In  some cases, loopholes are congressional mistakes: They arise from ambiguities or  omissions in the tax laws. More often, they arise because Congress has chosen to give  special treatment to specific types of behavior. For example, the U.S. federal tax code  gives preferential treatment to investors in municipal bonds because Congress wanted  to make it easier for state and local governments to borrow money. To some extent, 
Image of page 14
Image of page 15

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 29 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes