Nevermore 173 Remarque places emphasis on the inhumanity and loss of innocence

Nevermore 173 remarque places emphasis on the

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Remarque places emphasis on the inhumanity and loss of innocence of the men and how minute their lives were to Franz Kemmerich, one of the many men whose life is sacrificed for his country, has a pair of boot that everyone covets; Muller is one of them. When Muller asks Kemmerich for the boots Paul is astonished at his brazenness. He regards the situation as such, “Though Müller would be delighted to have Kemmerich's boots, he is really quite as sympathetic as another who could not bear to think of such a thing for grief. He merely sees things clearly. Were Kemmerich able to make any use of the boots, then Müller would rather go bare-foot over barbed wire than scheme how to get hold of them” (22). Just as nature is very repetitive theme in the novel, so are Kemmerich’s boots. Many people paint war as glorious Remarque is making the reality of such terrible events clear to his readers. Many people who read and learn about
war are firm in their belief that it is glorious. However, Remarque’s writing contradicts the picture painted by those who speak about life on the battlefield, and he accurately describes the reality of the terrible events that occur in such a harsh environment. In addition to symbolism, Remarque entwines imagery throughout his novel to show the horrendous effects of war. He uses imagery to try connect his audience to Paul in All Quiet on the Western Front, whose feelings about war are continuously shared throughout the novel. He writes, “The brown earth, the torn, blasted earth, with a greasy shine under the sun's rays; the earth is the background of this restless, gloomy world of automatons, our gasping is the scratching of a quill, our lips are dry, our heads are debauched with stupor--thus we stagger forward, and into our pierced and shattered souls bores the torturing image of the brown earth with the greasy sun and the convulsed and dead soldiers, who lie there--it can't be helped--who cry and clutch at our legs as we spring away over them. We have lost all feeling for one another. We can hardly control ourselves when our glance lights on the form of some other man. We are insensible, dead men, who through some trick, some dreadful magic, are still able to run and to kill” (115). The men begin to realize that the truth was not divulged to them during their days of training, and war is not pleasurable and illustrious, but ghastly and appalling. The soldiers, no longer naive of the consequences of war, begin to see their comrades taken away by things such as gangrene. In the beginning of the book, Franz Kemmerich, one of Paul’s friends, is hospitalized. Paul thinks as he looks upon Kemmerich’s condition, “We look at his bed covering. His leg lies under a wire basket. The bed covering arches over it. I kick Müller on the shin, for he is just about to tell Kemmerich what the orderlies told us outside: that Kemmerich has lost his foot. The leg is amputated. He looks ghastly, yellow and wan. In his face there are
already the strained lines that we know so well, we have seen them now hundreds of times.

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