Marketing managers must focus their marketing mixes on prospective customers

Marketing managers must focus their marketing mixes

This preview shows page 68 - 71 out of 80 pages.

For example, apparel manufacturers are the main customers for zippers.  Marketing managers must focus their marketing mixes on prospective  customers who exhibit characteristics similar to their current customers. North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes — groups of firms  in similar lines of business. The number of establishments, sales volumes, and number of employees— broken down by geographic areas—are given for each NAICS code. Many firms find their  current  customers’ NAICS codes and then look at  NAICS- coded lists for similar companies that may need the same goods and  services. Other companies look at which NAICS categories are growing or  declining to discover new opportunities PRODUCERS OF SERVICES—SMALLER AND  MORE SPREAD OUT The United States has almost 6 million service firms—more than 17 times as  many as it has manufacturers. But as you might guess given the large number of service firms, most of them are small. They’re also more spread out around the country than manufacturing  concerns.
Image of page 68
Service operations, in contrast, often have to be close to their customers. Buying may not be as formal Not a purchasing manager Personal selling is still an important part of promotion, but reach- ing these  customers in the first place of- ten requires more advertising. And small  service firms may need much more help in buying than a large corporation. Small service customers like Internet buying Small service companies that don’t attract much personal attention from  salespeople often rely on e-commerce for many of their purchases Purchases by small customers can add up A well-designed website can be efficient for both customers and suppliers. RETAILERS AND WHOLESALERS BUY FOR  THEIR CUSTOMERS Most retail and wholesale buyers see themselves as purchasing agents for  their target customers do  not  see themselves as sales agents for particular manufacturers. They buy  what they think they can profitably sell. Committee buying is impersonal Space in retail stores is limited, and buyers for retail chains simply are not  inter- ested in carrying every product presentation to Walmart had to include hard data that showed their marketing mix was already working well in other retail stores and evidence of their  ability to supply the large quantities a retailer the size of Walmart would  need. 26 Decisions to add or drop lines or change buying policies may be handled by a buy- ing committee. The seller may not get to present her story to the buying committee in person.
Image of page 69
This rational, almost cold-blooded, approach certainly reduces the impact of  a persuasive salesperson. Buyers watch computer output closely use automated control systems that create daily reports showing sales of  every product. f a product isn’t moving, the retailer isn’t likely to be impressed by a  salesperson’s request for more in-store attention or added shelf space. Reorders are straight rebuys 125,000 products. Because they deal with so many prod- ucts, most  intermediaries buy their products on a routine, automatic reorder basis—  straight rebuys—once they make the initial decision to stock specific items.
Image of page 70
Image of page 71

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 80 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture